This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
NEW PRODUCTS New year, new stock


From carbon handlebars to bamboo socks, BikeBiz takes a look at the latest cycling accessories...


Jimmy Beam Down Light Direct/seeking distributor: 07740 822300


INVENTOR JIM Thompson has told BikeBiz of a unique lighting product he plans to bring to market, dubbed the Jimmy Beam Down Light. Telling BikeBiz that he is open to linking with a


cycle trade distributor or partner in the lighting world, Thompson believes his creation could be part of the answer to the problem of cyclists being seen from all directions, as well as in blind spots. Furthermore, tests by Thompson and his team seem to indicate that passing traffic gives the cyclist more room than normal, thanks to the ‘context’ of width given by the side lighting. The Jimmy Beam Down Light consists of two sets of low-watt lights that are downward facing but can be adjusted on the vertical axis to offer a wider footprint if required. One unit fits at the front of the bike and one unit fits at the rear.


E*Thirteen M-rings Silverfish: 01752 843882


E*THIRTEEN HAS added dual width chainrings, with M-Ring tooth profiling, designed to keep your chain locked on your ring, not dropped on the trail. Machined with precision faces and chamfers to


control both tooth height and width, M-Ring single speed chainrings are designed to work with 8, 9, 10 and 11-speed set-ups and to keep control of the chain, leaving your customer to focus on the trail. Manufactured from 4.5mm thick EXAr aluminium,


e*thirteen’s highest grade alloy, M-Rings are compatible with all 104BCD or e*thirteen direct mount chainsets and are light enough for mounting to your XC race bike, yet strong enough to take the hits on your DH rig. All 104BCD M-Rings also feature 1mm of


chainline adjustment thanks to their flip-flop design making finding the perfect chainline even easier.


Niner ROS9 Jungle Products


BUILT FROM the ground up, the new steel ROS9 hardtail from Niner is one for the 29er aficionados. Featuring a burly 4130 Cro-Mo tubeset and 142mm bolt thru rear dropouts, it's built to last and track the trail responsively. Niner’s Bio-Centric 2 EBB system lends versatility to run either geared or singlespeed kits with fully removable cable guides added for a sleek finish. Furthermore, internal dropper post routing adds to a clean finish. The 44mm headtube allows a variety of fork fitments from 120 – 140mm travel, while BB tabs to run a custom MRP XCG bash guard complete the package. A frame, including Maxle, headset, dropouts for


both geared and singlespeed use and cable hardware comes in at £899. A complete Sram XO1 bike with custom coloured Revelation RCT3 fork will cost £3,799 at retail.


Renthal Fatbar Lite carbon Ison: 01353 662662


RENTHAL’S POPULAR FatBar has evolved with the introduction of four carbon handlebars to the range. The Fatbar Lite Carbon is designed for Trail, Enduro


and XC riders and racers. This all-new handlebar is – in terms of weight, strength, stiffness – up there with the best. An extensive R&D process ensures the Fatbar Lite Carbon feels like a Renthal handlebar, whilst retaining the strength and durability of a Renthal handlebar. The firm has achieved all of this, but at a super-low, market leading weight of just 180g, with a trail spec 740mm width. You’ll find 10, 20, 30 and 40mm rise options now in stock with Ison. Renthal assures us that an extensive research and


development process took place to ensure the correct ‘feel’. Blind tests with a variety of riders, as well as lab quantifying results were gathered and the Renthal FatBar performed ‘very well’ against the market’s best competition, according to the firm.


70 BIKEBIZ JANUARY


BIKEBIZ.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93