This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Sponsored by ELECTRIC BIKES


Cycling legend saddles up with Otley electric bike shop


83 year old Robinson plans to beat his own Holme Moss climbing record on an electric bicycle By Jonathon Harker


YORKSHIRE CYCLING legend Brian Robinson, the first Briton to finish the Tour de France and win a Tour stage, will recreate one of his glory moments on an electric bike.


Otley-based e-bikehire.com has given


Robinson an electric bike so he can tackle the gruelling 524metre high Holme Moss in the South Pennines – the iconic climb being a highlight of this year’s Grand Départ route. The 83-year-old Huddersfield veteran cyclist believes he still holds the UK record for riding up Holme Moss, in six minutes 10 seconds in 1951. Robinson is striving to better his time fuelled by electric power. Ian Morton, who established e-


bikehire.com with business partner Lee Robinson earlier this year, said: “Brian is such a legend in British cycling we thought it would be great to offer him an electric bike to test the challenges of the Grand Départ route. He is still a regular cyclist, however the added electric power will give Brian a boost and should make climbing Holme Moss a breeze.” Robinson, who clinched stage seven of the Tour de France in Brest back in 1958,


“The electric bike is


fantastic – when you are my age cycling up hills can be painful. I like the fact that I can measure the level of assistance I need and combine pedalling with electric power.” Brian Robinson


said: “The electric bike is fantastic – when you are my age cycling up hills can be pretty painful. “I like the fact that I can measure the level of assistance I need and combine pedalling with electric power.


“I haven’t set a date yet when I’ll tackle Holme Moss, but when I do my pals in the cycling club will get a bit of shock when I race past them!” Specialist electric bike company e-


bikehire.com offers self-hire and guided e-


bike tours of the Yorkshire Dales – including some of the planned Tour de France route – as well as selling electric- powered cycles. www.e-bikehire.com or call 01539 568163.


E-bike smart wheel rivals battle begins


The Copenhagen Wheel can be


locked via smart phone (below)


TWO WHEELS that turn standard bikes into electric bikes look set to go head-to- head in the global e-bike industry. The Copenhagen Wheel, first touted in


2009, is reportedly close to a commercial launch having received $2.1m in funding from the aptly named Spark Capital. Boston’s Superpedestrian has led development of the Copenhagen smart


wheel. Superpedestrian was co-founded by MIT SENSEable City Laboratory associate director Assaf Biderman who said: “By throwing a Copenhagen Wheel on your bike, you can ride almost anywhere – hills feel flattened, distances shrunk, and it’s connected through a range of apps that let you control and personalise your bike.” Investor Spark Capital is a Boston- based venture capital firm that has previously backed companies like Twitter and Tumblr. Meanwhile, the FlyKly Smart Wheel has


raised over $400,000 on crowd funding website Kickstarter and is planning to have product ready in March of this year. FlyKly claims its lightweight and efficient all-in-one design pedal assist will fit on practically any bicycle, with an ultra-thin electric motor and intelligent electronic within a robust housing, fitted onto the spokes of a bicycle rim. The clever tech allows the owner to remotely lock the motor and track it in case it gets stolen. http://tinyurl.com/smartwheelbattle


BIKEBIZ.COM BIKEBIZ JANUARY 49


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93