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MSc Criminology Who is it for?


You are a qualified professional working within criminal justice or in one of the many areas where crime and antisocial behaviour represent a challenge to the nature and wellbeing of the community. Alternatively you may be a recent graduate of social sciences or law seeking to enhance your educational qualifications in order to gain an advantage in the increasingly competitive graduate employment market.


About the Course


The prevention and control of crime features prominently on the political agenda of countries around the world, and the media’s obsession with crime stimulates public interest and anxiety. A persistent feature of contemporary crime control strategy is the need for more professional development opportunities for criminal justice practitioners. The MSc Criminology is designed to introduce you to some of the complex issues in contemporary criminology. It is set within a strong sociological, psychological and historical framework.


Course Content


The course consists of a mixture of compulsory and designated modules. To be eligible for the award you must successfully complete the compulsory modules and a range of designated modules.


Compulsory Modules • Criminological Theory


• Researching Victims and Offenders • Placement in a Criminal Justice Agency


• Methodologies and Ethics in Social Science


• Dissertation


Designated Modules • Criminology and Gender


• Race, Ethnicity and Criminal Justice • Comparative Criminal Law • International Criminology


• European and International Human Rights


• National Security, Terrorism and the Rule of Law


• Forensic Mental Health Care • Substance Use And Misuse


• The Legal Context for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Issues


• Qualitative Methods: Talk and Text • Qualitative Methods: In the Field • Thinking Statistically


• Analysing and Reporting Quantitative Research


• Violence and the Law in English Society • Gender and Crime in History 1650-1900 • Crime on Screen


• Comparative Transnational Criminology • International Organised Crime • European Crime and Society


Assessment


Assessment is based entirely on coursework. A range of different assignments has been developed to evaluate different abilities and challenge different levels of understanding throughout the year. There are no examinations.


Career Opportunities


Criminology has numerous vocational applications and people studying in the area can find various employment opportunities. A postgraduate qualification in criminology is seen as a highly desirable element in applications for careers in policing, the prison and probation services and in NGOs dealing with young offenders, rehabilitation services, victim support etc. It can also provide an additional qualification to those who work already in the area.


Duration of Course


The course commences in September of each year. You will attend lectures, seminars and workshops throughout two taught semesters followed by a period of supported independent study whilst you complete your dissertation.


Entry Requirements


You will normally hold a recognised First or Second Class Bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject area. ‘Non-standard’ applicants with appropriate experience will also be considered on an individual basis. Applicants for whom English is not their first language will need to demonstrate that they meet the minimum English language requirement of IELTS 6.5 (or equivalent).


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T +44 1604 892546 E international@northampton.ac.uk W www.northampton.ac.uk


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