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Wastes Management (distance learning)


Wastes Management recognises that a highly consuming industrial society will generate huge quantities of wastes as well as smaller quantities of more toxic material. To preserve our environment from extensive pollution, wastes need careful storage, treatment and disposal. Enormous strides are being made in waste treatment and waste can provide energy as well as useful raw materials. This module will provide you with the opportunity to assess the environmental impact and economics of current waste disposal, treatment and minimisation options.


Strategic Management in the Supply Chain Context (distance learning)


This module is designed to provide future managers with an introduction to International Supply Chain and Logistics Management, providing them with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to operate effectively beyond the bounds of their own organisations, in an era of increasing outsourcing activity, off-shoring of manufacturing and service provision. It enables them to understand the workings of the whole supply chain, to co-ordinate and manage decisions within their own organisations and to manage relations effectively with second and third-tier customers. Operations and supply chain decisions often require numerical analysis and the application of quantitative techniques; hence the module will include some numerical analysis and interpretation.


Marketing: Management and Principles (distance learning)


This module will establish and justify the core principles of the marketing concept. It will introduce the major decision areas in creating and delivering the offer, and will give a time perspective in the creation and implementation of marketplace strategy. Importantly, the module will give course members a strategic perspective of marketing management with respect to the analysis, planning, implementation and control of marketing activities.


Assessment


A wide range of approaches to teaching is used with a mixture of lectures, seminars, workshops and practical sessions. Course teaching materials are made available via the University’s virtual learning environment. Modules are mainly assessed by coursework including practical reports, presentations, literature reviews and dissertation.


Career Opportunities


Graduates in Leather Technology are in high demand and are able to secure suitable posts in the leather production or associated industries including technical management, research and development, technical service, higher education and government bodies. Demand exceeds supply and opportunities are available worldwide. Employment opportunities can also be found in other material production or chemical industries. Past graduates have also progressed to MPhil or PhD studies at the University of Northampton.


Duration of Course


The programme is in a blended learning format. The taught provision for the course is undertaken within 12-14 weeks at the University of Northampton. Assessments and the dissertation may be carried out at the University or off-site at the students’ place of residence.


Option 1 Stage 1


Intensive 12-14 week delivery of taught provision


Entry Requirements


You will normally hold a recognised First or Second Class Bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject area. Students with lower level qualifications, but relevant experience in the leather industry will also be considered on an individual basis. Applicants for whom English is not their first language will need to demonstrate that they meet the expected minimum English language requirement of IELTS 6.5 (or equivalent).


Stage 2 Assignments


All on-site at the University of Northampton Option 2 Stage 1


Stage 2


Intensive 12-14 week delivery of taught provision


On-site at the University of Northampton


Assignments


Stage 3 Dissertation


Visa Type Tier 4


Stage 3 Dissertation Country of Residence


Visa Type


Student Visitors Visa for Stage 1 only


T +44 1604 892546 E international@northampton.ac.uk W www.northampton.ac.uk


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