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MA English Language Teaching Who is it for?


You are a graduate who wishes to utilise your experience of successful second language acquisition to develop the knowledge and skills needed to pursue a career in English Language Teaching. The programme is particularly designed for non-native speakers and/ or those who have little or no previous teaching experience.


About the Course


This course adopts a practice-led approach, enabling you to develop a robust understanding of the practice of English language teaching alongside the underpinning pedagogic and linguistic theory. You will learn about issues and trends in language teaching methodology, classroom approaches to teaching the four language skills, classroom assessment, language test construction and evaluation, and materials design and development. You will also complete a large-scale research project on a topic of your choice relating to one of the core themes covered during the programme. Through successful completion of the programme you will develop a thorough understanding of the practice and theory of English language teaching and assessment, enabling you to develop a career in this field.


Course Content


Through the programme you will learn how the development of linguistics (the scientific understanding of language) and the theory of language acquisition have influenced trends in English language teaching methodologies. You will learn about methods of teaching each of the four language skills, including lesson planning, classroom dynamics and management, presentation, explanation, modelling, feedback, and learning styles. You will investigate the selection, adaptation and evaluation of learning materials, including both published and self-developed resources. You will also examine different types of language assessment, the role and application of formative and summative assessment, and processes for developing and evaluating test materials.


Modules


• Trends in General Linguistics and ELT • Language Acquisition Theory and ELT • Introduction to Language Teaching One • Introduction to Language Teaching Two


• Classroom Language Assessment and Test Construction


• Materials Design and Development • Research Project


Assessment You will be assessed through a variety of individual and group-based assessments which can include written reports, lesson plans, seminar presentations, poster presentations and a research project.


Career Opportunities


With the ever increasing use of English as an international language in business, education and the workplace, and the emergence of variations of English (i.e. regional varieties of English with local and widening ‘legitimacy’), it seems likely that there will be a growing demand for non-native English teachers who combine expert use of the language with a thorough grounding in language teaching pedagogy. This programme prepares you effectively for English language teaching roles in language schools, colleges and universities around the world.


Duration of Course


There is an intake for this programme each September. The programme is designed to be completed in 12 months (full-time), with two taught semesters followed by a period of time during which you complete your independent research project.


Entry Requirements


To be accepted onto this programme you will normally need to hold a recognised First or Second Class Bachelor’s degree. Any academic discipline is acceptable. If English is not your first language, you will need to demonstrate that you meet the minimum English language requirement of IELTS 7.0 (or equivalent).


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T +44 1604 892546 E international@northampton.ac.uk W www.northampton.ac.uk


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