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HVAC


KEEPING YOUR COOL


As the saying goes, prevention is better than cure, or in industrial maintenance terms, condition monitoring is more effective than failure maintenance. RAB Specialist Engineers’ Richard Betts offers some practical advice on how to reduce expensive maintenance schedules, simply by fitting air intake filter screens.


ABOUT RAB


SPECIALIST ENGINEERS With over 30 years of professional experience, RAB Specialist Engineers provides consulting and engineering support to the building services sector, including ductwork, pipework, insulation, pump services, heating and ventilation. RAB Specialist Engineers also provides simple and cost effective air intake screens for cooling towers, chillers and HVAC systems.


Airborne debris, such as domestic waste, leaves, pollen, insects and even plastic carrier bags is the leading cause of fouling and clogging of cooling towers, heat exchangers, air cooled chillers and other HVAC systems. As a result, businesses are wasting thousands of pounds each year due to inefficient air-handling systems that require replacement or frequent maintenance. This can have significant cost implications for any business’s profitability.


Well-maintained equipment costs less to operate, ensures optimal life expectancy and maximises energy


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efficiencies. Furthermore, ensuring that your HVAC equipment delivers consistent high-level performance alleviates the need for unnecessary servicing and warranty claims. Research suggests that for every 1,000 tonnes of refrigeration capacity consuming 750kw of compressor energy, an additional £31.50 per hour (£63,000 per annum) is incurred from inefficient systems, based upon 2,000 hours service.


ENERGY INCREASE Restricted airflow through HVAC


equipment will occur when twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


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