This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TRAINING & EDUCATION


BEYOND GOOD


Getting a disparate set of providers working together to deliver a seamless guest experience can be the difference between just good enough and truly excellent service. Anthony Bennett from Bennett Hay shares his tips on achieving five-star service.


It’s a cliché that FM is a ‘people business’ but when those people are the first point of contact for visitors or responsible for preparing and serving food, then their attitude and behaviour is especially critical to the perception of an organisation. Successful FM depends on teamwork. FM providers frequently inherit staff under TUPE regulations and if they are not working together effectively, then changing this will be the key to improving service delivery, guest perception and ultimately client satisfaction.


Bennett Hay’s success depends on our ability to transform teams. It’s


26 | TOMORROW’S FM


so important that we named our training initiative the Transformation Academy. The Academy aims to bring people from different service streams together into one team. It was created to transfer the hotel industry’s ethos and commitment to customer service to the FM sector. Lead by hotel and hospitality training expert, Fiona Rassell, the Academy instils the specific skills, attitudes and behaviours staff need to enhance the service they provide to guests. The Academy’s training cuts across divisions, working with the combined onsite team, whether


in house, Bennett Hay or separately contracted staff.


Clients looking to achieve a higher level of service often use the term ‘five-star service’. Our management team brings the experience of working in five-star environments and translates this into the workplace. Five-star service is about a mentality, a way of working, discipline and most of all, a healthy disdain for anything mediocre.


THREE PRINCIPLES The Transformation Academy


focuses on three simple principles: twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64