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WORKSHOPS, DEPOTS & LIFTING EQUIPMENT


Neutral pH cleaners for the rail industry


Jim Knox of Gard Chemicals updates RTM on its new range of cleaning chemicals.


G


ard Chemicals, a specialist manufacturer of cleaning and maintenance products


for the rail industry, has recently introduced a neutral pH range of cleaning chemicals to replace traditional cleaning methods and formulations such as acid/alkali dual stage washing and high alkaline pit road degreasers. Unlike caustic or highly alkaline cleaners these products do not adversely affect paintwork.


This neutral range has been independently evaluated by a UK laboratory and pH values were found to be within normal consent to discharge limits at strongest dilutions, thus enabling users to manage and control discharges more effectively. Performance and compatibility testing on surfaces normally encountered within the railway environment included all current paint systems, decals, GRP,


rubber, formica, plastic, upholstery etc.


Our extensive range of rail industry products, manufactured under ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 accreditations, are supplied to TOCs, FOCs, rail manufacturers and cleaning contractors.


These products include external carriage wash detergents for both automatic and hand bash applications, pit road degreasers, bogie and underframe cleaners as well as specialised cleaners for safety fl ooring, unit restoration polish to restore dull paint work, graffi ti protection products, fast drying, high refl ectivity line marking paint, together with a range of internal scents.


The New Product Development Department (NPD) at Gard Chemicals works directly with


the rail industry and will formulate for any specifi c cleaning needs/applications. Enquiries from companies with a specifi c need or who wish to make their own facility safer and more environmentally friendly/cost effective are invited and fully trained technical staff are available either ‘in-house’ or on-site to assist in the development of any new products that you may require.


Gard Chemicals is the trading name of Larragard Ltd, a registered member of Link- up (Supplier No: 24057), the UK Rail Industry Supplier Qualifi cation Scheme.


TELL US WHAT YOU THINK


T: 01924 403550 E: jimknox@gardchemicals.com W: www.gardchemicals.com


Increase in sliding and folding doors


Mark Jewers, Phoenix director at Jewers Doors, explains the benefi ts of Swift doors for depots.


M


ore and more contractors in the UK and beyond are


specifying Swift sliding and folding doors for train and tram entrances to maintenance depots, and other vehicular openings to depots, wheel lathes, train washes, train assembly workshops and other industrial buildings.


Designed, manufactured and installed by UK-based Jewers Doors, Swift doors are designed to open and close safely around live overhead-line equipment.


Rail tracks are not affected by the operation of the doors, as the leaves sweep across the tracks without the need for a bottom guide channel in the threshold.


Opening horizontally, Swift doors provide full-height visibility to the train driver at all times, and can easily be interlinked with the depot protection system to prevent


56 | rail technology magazine Dec/Jan 13 TELL US WHAT YOU THINK


T: +44 (0)1767 317090 E: mjewers@jewersdoors.co.uk W: www.jewersdoors.co.uk


accidents.


Swift doors are simple to design into new-build projects or can be retro-fi tted into existing buildings to replace tired roller shutters or overhead doors.


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