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ROLLING STOCK


The existing axle mounted gear wheel and final drive casing will be used, with the existing pinion fitted to the new AC motor shaft. The gear ratio will be the same as the existing final drive.


The decision was taken to replace the existing main transformer with a modern transformer, using the same mounting positions as the existing transformer.


Barras added: “We had to consider safety case reasons, the integrity of the existing transformer when subjected to regenerative energy and its suitability to operate with the new traction system.”


The present HT cable will be replaced with a modern cable, gland and plug assembly. Additional current and voltage monitoring devices and a new type of VCB will also be incorporated into the traction supply system.


Both Barras and Carrington acknowledged that the present WSP system is unreliable and suffers with obsolescence issues. As a result, a modern WSP system incorporated with the Knorr-Bremse EP98 brake control system will replace the present brake control and WSP system on all four vehicles in a unit. This will provide traction/friction brake blending throughout the unit and enable maximum regeneration of braking energy to maximise


energy savings, brake pad and disc replacement costs. Preliminary investigations show that reductions of up to 17% energy costs, 50% brake pad costs and 80% brake disc costs can be realised. In addition, the replacement WSP system will reduce wheel flats and reduce wheel turning costs by up to 90% of the present Class 321 units.


Carrington said: “The Knorr-Bremse EP98/ WSP system was selected because of their experience with modern UK EMUs, and five Class 321 units have already been fitted with the Knorr-Bremse WSP system for evaluation purposes. We are working with both Knorr- Bremse and Vossloh Kiepe to optimise the blending scheme and now the potential savings for energy and maintenance is very significant.”


A new auxiliary supply system and associated increased battery capacity will be provided to supply power for the HVAC provided by other contractors and to meet the enhanced emergency ventilation requirements. Due to the increased supply requirement of these systems and the restricted nature of the motor car vehicle, the new auxiliary converter and battery box will be located on one of the driving trailer cars.


One of the major challenges the team face on this project is the integration of modern traction and braking systems into an existing unit with


the minimum of mechanical and electrical disruption to the existing vehicle systems and infrastructure. This will be important to minimise both installation and operating costs for the upgraded units.


Both Carrington and Barras agreed that effective communication will be vital in ensuring the deadline is met and the feasibility study is successful. Barras explained: “We are in constant dialogue with Eversholt Rail Group and our safety engineering partners Lloyds Register Rail, as well as Knorr-Bremse and our colleagues at Vossloh Kiepe in Germany.


“Between Vossloh Kiepe in Germany and the UK we have up to 10 experienced engineers working on the Feasibility Study, who will also be involved on the pre-production and fleet fit phases.”


This collaborative approach has been welcomed by Eversholt Rail Group, according to Carrington, who said: “We have a strong team of specialists and highly experienced engineers from a number of companies on this project, all working towards a common goal. We’re very excited about the direction this study is taking and the opportunities it has revealed.”


FOR MORE INFORMATION www.vossloh-kiepe.co.uk www.eversholtrail.co.uk


rail technology magazine Dec/Jan 13 | 51


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