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ADVANCED RAIL CONTROL


This is particularly relevant where a large amount of retrofi tting is required, such as for Network Rail’s ERTMS roll-out programme across the UK. It is less of an issue with CBTC systems, as the fl eet will usually be designed to be integrated with in-cab signalling from the outset.


The movement of information presented to a driver into the train cab, as opposed to the lines on which the train operates, allows for a much greater throughput of traffi c.


However in order to remove line-side signals, all vehicles wishing to use this line must be fi tted with the onboard system.


This often means that retrofi t will be required, rather than phasing in through the use of new trains. Therefore, with reference to the UK, a signifi cant proportion of the work associated with the successful migration to ERTMS involves overcoming the challenges that retrofi tting existing trains presents, from the operational headaches associated with taking a train out of action to more prosaic challenges such as fi nding space on the train to fi t the kit.


This must be achieved for not only the passenger fl eets, but also the freight and on- track machinery along with heritage and open access trains.


With the many differing makes, models and varieties of trains operating on the network, signifi cant expertise is required to safely and effi ciently fi t each train type with onboard ERTMS systems. Each model of train has a


i More stories like this at:


www.railtechnologymagazine.com/ track-and-signalling


Above: Spain is a worldwide leader in ERTMS deployment, and earlier this year Madrid’s 112 Civia trains entered service using the signalling system.


Retrofi t also subjects signalling equipment to a number of atypical stresses including sub- optimal power supplies, EMC noise, vibration and moisture, so ensuring that it functions correctly is a signifi cant challenge.


Key industry programme spotlight – ERTMS


Key ARCS-based schemes currently being progressed are the delivery of ERTMS across the East Coast and Great Western main lines; Interfl eet’s team is currently working with industry to establish delivery plans for these complex and challenging major


schemes. Although the Great Western Main Line will


different cab – few of which were designed with hosting the latest technology in mind – meaning that every cab type must be assessed to determine a suitable location for the technologies, with small cab sizes contributing to the diffi culty.


initially keep its line-side signals in place, allowing non-ERTMS fi tted vehicles to still run, the East Coast Main Line will be implemented with ERTMS Level 2 without lineside signals, meaning that every vehicle using this line will need to be retrofi tted with ERTMS technology by the proposed scheme completion dates, 2018-2020.


As freight trains run all over the country, a signifi cant proportion of the UK freight fl eet will need to be fi tted before the fi rst stage of East Coast in order to maintain this fl exibility.


With major schemes including Thameslink, Crossrail and HS2 all reliant on ERTMS, an estimated 2,500 rail vehicles in the UK will need to be retrofi tted with ERTMS in the next 15 years.


Conclusion


ARCS-based solutions and technologies stand to revolutionise UK rail – from increased capacity to improved safety – and their successful roll out is essential to the future of UK rail. Signifi cant investment is being made right across the industry – from mainline rail to metro systems – and it is crucial that delivery is expertly assessed and executed.


Matt Phillips FOR MORE INFORMATION


E: phillips.m@interfl eet.co.uk W: www.interfl eet.co.uk


rail technology magazine Dec/Jan 13 | 49


© Comunidad de Madrid


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