This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TRACK TECHNOLOGY


excavating “problematic” wetbeds.


Gilmore, who had earlier been an engineer with the Army, said the speed at which old ballast was sucked up, clearing the space required to allow new ballast to be replaced was deeply impressive and that he had “seen nothing like it”.


“When you can exploit mid-week possession opportunities as well, it really makes the cost of hiring out the RailVac and its team look very good value.”


The Doncaster demo was followed up by a site visit at Micheldever, along with colleagues from AmeyColas and Crossrail, to see the machine


Railcare noted that the points, affecting lines 2 and 3 one mile outside of Paddington, had become something of a maintenance ‘cause celebre’ due to an earlier engineering measuring error. But Gilmore was determined to persuade senior managers at Network Rail and Crossrail that the RailVac was the solution they’d been looking for, explaining: “Ladbroke Grove was a very high profile job due to its past, and its subsequent record. Claiming we’d found a solution – albeit one that many of those we were trying to persuade had never seen for themselves, made a lot of the decision-makers very nervous. But we pushed and pushed, and finally got the decision we wanted to go ahead with the RailVac at Ladbroke Grove.”


The team got a 27-hour weekend possession at the end of October, with the RailVac waiting at the North Pole Eurostar depot nearby, to make best use of the available time.


The switch and crossing unit (S&C) was excavated to the required depth by the RailVac, which removed 250mm, so the track could be dropped back into the correct position.


The RailVac excavated about 80 metres on line 3 and 50 metres on line 2 in six hours, under the planned 7.5hrs. The whole S&C set 8057 was restored to its correct height within the possession time, the line speed restriction was lifted and normal rail traffic operations could resume – after 18 months – as usual.


A Railcare spokesman said: “Doing things in an innovative and totally different way usually means those involved need to adapt to change. For many people, especially in a working environment where doing things the traditional way has become the accepted norm and modus operandi, change is both hard to grasp and very difficult to envisage, and involves a huge leap of faith.”


Gilmore said: “I think a lot of minds were changed that night.”


www.railcareexport.com FOR MORE INFORMATION


Karl Gilmore


rail technology magazine Dec/Jan 13 | 37


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92