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“M


ore than 100 million people will die and global economic growth will be cut by 3.2 per cent of gross domestic product by 2030 if the world fails to tackle climate change... .” That’s from a September 26 Reuters news service story reporting on the projected impact of global


warming, as outlined in a document released by independent international organization DARA. It states that deaths from hunger, disease and air pollution are set to rapidly accelerate in developing countries,


and the damage to fishing and agriculture will affect the food supply for the whole planet. According to the National Climatic Data Center, in August alone, over 4200 daily warm temperature records


were broken in America, while an October 4 story in The New York Times reported that “Scorching heat and drought in the United States, Russia and Europe constricted agricultural production and pushed up prices of corn and soybeans to record highs.” This in turn has driven the price of pork and poultry up. (Bacon shortage? Nooo!) Actually, skyrocketing meat prices are a good thing overall because we (the First World, with China and India


rapidly catching up) consume too much of it. Most of us eat more animal protein than our bodies need, and more than the Earth can sustain (forget cars, the number one cause of greenhouse gas by a very large margin is actually methane produced by cow farts – gross but true). As widely reported, we consume so much food that rates of obesity have risen to the point that, for the first time in North America, the average life expectancy is dropping. The 2012 end-of-world hype aside, it’s obvious why apocalypse movies are so popular, given all these indicators


that we’re a species in decline. Our two largest articles in this issue concern films with an apocalyptic bent (Prince of Darkness and The Bay), and last issue featured the nine-page Cinema Apocalyptica end-of-the-world movies guide. There are plenty of books, comic book series, TV shows and video games centred around apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic scenarios. And zombies have become the poster ghouls of the era. So much end times. I love apocalypse tales; there’s so much at stake in the man vs. man vs. nature scenario. But I despise the


reality of man vs. fantasy. Too many people expend more time, energy and passion watching/playing/reading/talk- ing, arguing and social networking about their favourite movies/games/books/etc. than they do on diet, exercise, preserving their environment, discussing politics and other real-world things, and it’s killing us – literally. What does it say about us that the Facebook page for the real-life CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) has just over 1000 “Likes,” while the Facebook page for the fictional Umbrella Corporation of the Resident Evil games/movies has over 710,000? As the costs of basic necessities jump, fun pop-culture stuff is first to go, so consider this my plea for self-


preservation. But how do we shift our way of thinking? Horror is particularly good at having a social conscience, and we need more of that, for starters. Romero’s


Dead films got us thinking about consumerism, militarism and racism, while the nuclear apocalypse-themed TV movies of the ’80s, such as Threads, terrifyingly raised awareness about the Bomb. Currently, The Bay (as director Barry Levinson explains) incorporates as much scientific fact as possible into a story of pollution-borne parasites in order to frighten us about the consequences of dumping agricultural waste into the ocean. However, as my old D.O.A. band T-shirt reminds me: Talk – Action = 0. Thankfully there are those working through the genre to enact more tangible change. On a local level, the 2012


Toronto Zombie Walk at the time of this writing, is set to team up with the Heart and Stroke Foundation and Canada’s Wonderland for an event at the end of October called The Undeading of Wonderland, where the walkers visit the theme park to try to break the world record for group CPR training. It’s a great example of horror culture driving self-improvement. On a more global level there’s Participant Media, a company founded by eBay creator Jeff Skoll, which has


produced movies such as Fast Food Nation, An Inconvenient Truth, Syriana, plus apocalyptic films The Crazies (2010) and Contagion (2010). The company’s mission: “To entertain audiences first, then to invite them to par- ticipate in making a difference. To facilitate this, Participant creates specific social action campaigns for each film and documentary designed to give a voice to issues that resonate in the films. Participant teams with social sector organizations, non-profits and corporations who are committed to creating an open forum for discussion, education and who can, with Participant, offer specific ways for audience members to get involved.” For The Crazies, Participant held screenings, created websites and used social networking to urge viewers to


send letters to politicians in support of the Chemical Facilities Anti-Terrorism Act (which more tightly restricts dangerous chemicals). With Contagion, the company created a viral video about the threat of pandemics and helped push the US government to allocate more funds for disease outbreak response. I believe we have to treat the horror genre as something more than simply an escape from the real world.


Those zombies in Resident Evil? They aren’t really going to bite you in the ass. Reality, however, already has, so it’s time we asked ourselves what we’re gonna do about it.


STAFF


PUBLISHER Rodrigo Gudiño


MANAGING EDITOR Monica S. Kuebler


ART DIRECTOR Justin Erickson


GRAPHIC DESIGNER ANDREW WRIGHT


OFFICE MANAGER ron mckenzie


MARKETING/ADVERTISING MANAGER


Jody Infurnari PH: 905-985-0430 FX: 905-985-4195 E: jody@rue-morgue.com


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF dave alexander


INTERIM ASSOCIATE EDITOR/ ONLINE EDITOR april snellings


COPY EDITOR claire horsnell


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER Marco Pecota


INTERNS lime blake vanessa furtado derek nieto charlotte stear


RUE MORGUE INTERNATIONAL fabien delage (FRANCE) facebook.com/RueMorgueFrance richard gladman (UK) facebook.com/RueMorgueUK moaner t. lawrence (GERMANY) facebook.com/RueMorgueGermany aaron soto (MEXICO) facebook.com/RueMorgueMexico


CONTRIBUTORS


STUART F. ANDREWS MIKE BEARDSALL A.S. BERMAN LYLE BLACKBURN JOHN W. BOWEN PHIL BROWN JAMES BURRELL PEDRO CABEZUELO HARVEY F. CHARTRAND PAUL CORUPE PATRICK DOLAN MICHAEL DOYLE JAY FOSGITT DAVID KRAUSE


THE GORE-MET MARK R. HASAN JEREMY HOBBS CHRIS JOZEFOWICZ LIISA LADOUCEUR LAST CHANCE LANCE JOSEPH O’BRIEN DEJAN OGNJANOVIC GEORGE PACHECO SEAN PLUMMER GARY PULLIN JESSA SOBCZUK JOSÈ TEODORO TREVOR TUMINSKI JUDI WAYMARK


RUE MORGUE #128 would not have been possible without the valuable assistance of: Ian Rogers, Mary-Beth Hollyer, Al McMullan, Alan Howarth, Mark Banning and the Giant Gila Monster.


COVER:PRINCE OF DARKNESS Design by Justin Erickson.


Rue Morgue Magazine is published monthly (with the exception of February) and accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photos, art or other materials. Freelance submissions accompanied by S.A.S.E. will be seriously considered and, if necessary, returned.


We acknowledge the financial support of the Gov- ernment of Canada through the Canada Periodical


RM6 dave@rue-morgue.com


Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities. RUE MORGUE Magazine #128ºº∆ ISSN 1481 – 1103 Agreement No. 40033764 Entire contents copyright MARRS MEDIA INC. 2012. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN CANADA.


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