This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PUBLIC EDUCATION ACCOUNTABILITY


the year went along the junior high were next to come on board and high school were after that. High school teachers are more confident and harder to bring about change. (Interview, 2004)


According to the interviews, training was provided to the educational staff, administrative staff, and local board. It was imperative that everyone learned what was correct procedure and appropriate actions, which had not been the norm prior to the takeover. When asked about the impact of training, another administrator shared the following:


I think the impact that that had was really a favorable one. Again, we were like in a training mode in Logan County. It was as if no one had shown how to do things should be done correctly. It was a unique situation to finally be doing things correctly. Again, it was a training mode. Things were being done correctly probably for the first time. The local board had no authority and they too were being trained. They were being trained on how things should be and that it was not a political decision, but it had to be done according to code. So, it was training. (Interview, 2004)


A variety of relationships evolved during and after the takeover. Prior to the takeover, the LCPSS was a model of radical relationships with power as the key feature in the organization. During the takeover, the power shifted to a unitary type of relationship (power, authority, and control moved the organization toward one common goal through teamwork and empowerment). A pluralist type of relationship (power is viewed as a medium through which conflicts of interest are resolved, and power holders have multiple sources of power) would most likely describe the relationship that now exists in the county and promotes sustainability.


There was a reported good working relationship between the local board and the State- Appointed Superintendent, as provided in the following passage:


Overall, the board members were supportive. The support varied with individual differences but it worked. Through the whole process the board was involved even though they were not allowed to make decisions. It was important to educate them and make them aware of what they should be doing. They needed to understand how to do things right. The board president was a strong factor in the success of the takeover. The positive attitude grew with him, and he was supportive of me. I had only one board member that was negative. The board president didn’t agree with takeover but worked with me and this was crucial. I had full support of the State Superintendent through the whole process, and that was another item or factor for success. (Interview, 2004)


84


Virginia Educational Leadership


Vol. 8 No. 1


Spring 2011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com