This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
AFL


marker. The students answer the questions by writing on the boards and then holding the boards up for the teacher to see. As the teacher notices common mistakes, he or she will take a moment to reinforce the content with the class or even with an individual student. The students keep track on a piece of paper of the questions and answers that were difficult for them. This piece of paper becomes a personalized study guide to use that night in preparation for the next day.


Consider the assessment data that is being received and used in this activity. The teacher receives data on the class as a whole. He or she is able to see what the class, in general, does or does not understand. If re-teaching or reinforcing is necessary, the teacher will know. The teacher receives data on individual students at the same time. On top of that, the students are receiving valuable feedback that will directly guide their studies. This gets to the very heart of AFL - assessment data being used to improve teaching and increase learning. More online at: http://salemafl.ning.com/profiles/blogs/an-afl-review-strategy-that


THE REPLACEABLE QUIZ A teacher gives a quiz in the traditional manner in which quizzes are given. The quiz goes into the grade book, but only temporarily. A more comprehensive test is coming soon. The test will be broken down into sections that correspond with the quizzes that have been given previously. The students can use their old quizzes to prepare for the test. Quiz grades will then be replaced with the grade earned on the corresponding section of the test. The quiz then becomes a learning tool to help students gauge their level of understanding and guide their studying.


This strategy provides a stark contrast to the more common way that quizzes are used in classrooms. Essentially, quizzes tend to be used as small summative assessments. While students are often encouraged to study their quizzes to prepare for a larger test, the incentive to do so is lessened by the fact that the quiz grade has been entered into the grade book and will average into the final grade. However, if students know that they will be able to completely erase a quiz grade by how they perform on the final test, then there is a great incentive for them to study the quiz. This, in turn, opens up the door for the teacher to encourage students to analyze their progress. Teachers might ask students to consider, why did you get that grade? What do you not understand? What are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? These are probing questions that we want students to try to answer. When a teacher uses AFL in this manner there is a much greater chance that the students will begin to analyze their own progress, take ownership of it, and make the changes necessary for improvement and learning.


58


Virginia Educational Leadership


Vol. 8 No. 1


Spring 2011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com