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After the skit, the instructor can use a multi-staged sequen- tial debrief to draw meaning out of the exercise.With this debriefing technique, the participants are instructed to take two or three minutes to write out a list of the mistakes made by the instructor during the lesson and solutions to those mistakes. Then, the students pair up and discuss their lists with one another. The pairs are folded into groups of four, the groups of four into groups of eight, and so on while continuing to add to the list. Depending on the size of the group, this process occurs


until the whole group comes together again. This technique encourages the quieter members of the group to share their


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thoughts in smaller groups before the large group discussion occurs.When the group is back together, the instructor asks each participant to share one of the mistakes observed along with a solution. There might be disagreement on whether some of the actions were actually mistakes. This can provide fodder for a rich discussion. The purpose of this article was to help highlight some


of the common mistakes that outdoor educators make, such as those related to group position, delivery, content, pace, and professionalism. Particularly in the outdoors, when there are so many other distractions, it is important to pay attention to our surroundings and the verbal and non-verbal feedback of the students and adjust our approach accord- ingly. As professional outdoor educators, we are likely to be more effective when we understand our teaching tendencies and work toward constant improvement.


Brad Daniel is Professor of Outdoor Education and Envi- ronmental Studies at Montreat College in Montreat, North Carolina. He is co-founder of the Master of Science program in Environmental Education. A video of Brad performing the skit can be seen at www.montreat.edu/oe/videos/. He can be reached at bdaniel@montreat.edu .


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