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Case Study:


UPMARKET LAUNDRY UPGRADES TO BRIGHTLOGIC AUTOMATED DOSING SYSTEM FOR CONSISTENCY AND RELIABILITY.


Established in 1994, The Dry Cleaning Business has from the outset offered the highest quality dry cleaning and laundry service to guests staying in London’s premier hotels. The business recently expanded with the acquisition of a similar Oxford based company and, having outgrown its original premises, relocated to a purpose-designed facility in West London. Today, its client base spans hotels and private individuals in and around Oxford and across Greater London.


Measuring over 6,000 square feet, clean, tidy and brightly lit, everything about its new premises reflects the high standards of The Dry Cleaning Business. After a total investment of over a million pounds the business now boasts some of the latest laundry and dry cleaning equipment.


Many of London and Oxford’s leading four and five star hotels rely on the company to consistently meet the highest standards of a demanding clientele. A quality finish and a swift turnaround therefore count for everything at The Dry Cleaning Business, and it cannot afford to be let down by unreliable or malfunctioning equipment.


“Reliability is my number one consideration when it comes to our choice of equipment in the laundry,” says Avnish Patel, proprietor of The Dry Cleaning Business. “That’s why switching to Brightwell’s latest BrightLogic dosing system has been such as success for us.


Each suction wand is connected to a low level alarm designed to alert the team when chemical containers need replacing. This is particularly useful at The Dry Cleaning Business as all the pumps and chemicals are hidden neatly away in a back room behind the main laundry and finishing area.


It has been installed for over a year and in that time it’s proven to be exceptionally reliable and low-maintenance.”


The laundry opens from 7am and has two 18kg and two 23kg capacity washers in virtually constant use throughout the day. It uses a range of washing programmes for the different types of work including hotel resident and private client garments of all types as well as hotel uniforms. Most washing is at low temperatures and each machine uses two types of detergent and a conditioner from the P&G Professional range.


For automated dosing of the four washers the laundry has two BrightLogic WL4 four-pump units and two WH4 four-pump Highflow laundry units. The whole system also includes BrightLogic manifolds and suction wands in each chemical container as well as BrightChem tubing throughout.


The original BrightChem tubing has been in place for over a year and has proven itself both in terms of robust chemical resistance and providing consistent flow rates.


48 | TOMORROW’S CLEANING | The future of our cleaning industry CHEMICALS & DOSING EQUIPMENT


“We also need equipment that is easy to use,” Patel continues. “English isn’t the first language of many of our employees, so it is important to keep communication simple and effective. The BrightLogic Formula Select remote programmer displays on the front of every washer ensure everyone can easily choose the right programme for every wash, and see at-a-glance that it is correct.”


BrightLogic also has a role to play in helping The Dry Cleaning Business to maintain environmental as well as premium quality standards. It uses modern energy efficient equipment, low temperature washes and more environmentally friendly chemicals wherever it can. It is also pioneering the use of wet cleaning for selected applications.


“I’d recommend the BrightLogic dosing system to any laundry,” Patel concludes. “I can leave the BrightLogic system to do its job and it leaves me and my team to get on with ours.”


www.brightwell.co.uk


Picture provided by PDS, Official UK partner of P&G Professional. www.profdosingsolutions.com


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