This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE
I’m a hopeless swimmer,” Hattit says. “Andy will get in the water and help me with my stroke, but inevitably he’ll shake his head and say, ‘Don’t tell anyone you’re my mother.’


The event consisted of swimming with a tennis ball, jogging with baby strollers for the bike course, and a dizzy-bat race for the run.


“It’s been a lot of fun to enjoy the sport as a family,” Andy says. “We’ll often meet up in transition and help each other out with lube or rubber bands. Of course, my rack is usually a little easier to find than theirs.”


It’s tough to miss Team Potts. Andy gives his uncle, David, some of his old tri race suits, complete with “Potts” on the rear end. “I’m the slow Potts,” David Potts tells people. Andy got his mom a bike and the entire clan has TYR swim gear.


“We have no excuses,” Hattit says. “He outfits us literally head to toe between swimsuits and paddles, goggles, bike helmets and shoes. But he also provides a lot of support. If he’s not at the race himself, he’ll call right after. He’s our No.1 fan.”


Because of Andy Potts’ strong swim background — he was a standout swimmer at the University of Michigan — people naturally assume he’s from a family of swimmers. Actually, most of the Potts triathletes are typical tri newcomers with little swim background.


“I’m a hopeless swimmer,” Hattit says, laughing. “Andy will get in the water and help me with my stroke, but inevitably he’ll shake his head and say, ‘Don’t tell anyone you’re my mother.’”


Like Andy Potts, 2008 Olympian Sarah Haskins has enjoyed mentoring her parents into triathlon. Brian Haskins, 54, was looking to get in shape early in 2010 and completed a half-marathon. After Sarah suggested a sprint triathlon would be less taxing on his joints, he completed the Ballwin Triathlon near St. Louis at the end of July.


Becky Haskins, 52, joined her husband to make her multisport debut at a triathlon in Edwardsville, Ill., in September. Sarah’s dad is considering attempting an Olympic-distance event in 2011.


Since Becky and Sarah, 29, are about the same size, Becky has a pro triathlete caliber wardrobe. Dad has to settle for customized workouts.


The couple owns a self-storage business in the St. Louis area and frequently travels to Sarah’s events in the Midwest. Brian Haskins sits on several community boards and is involved in a wellness initiative for fire departments.


His daughter enjoys the camaraderie of mentoring and training with her parents.


“Being a pro athlete and knowing so much about nutrition and fitness, it’s really important for my family to get involved in exercise and eating healthy,” Sarah Haskins says. “I think the country in general is going through a realization that this is important. Plus, it’s just fun to ride with my dad. I know when I’m retired professionally I’m going to still be able to work out with my family.”


Unlike Haskins or Potts, Laura Bennett, 35, is something of a second-generation triathlete. Her older brothers, David and John Reback, began competing in triathlons as youngsters in South Florida and introduced their father, Paul, to the sport. Laura tagged along and soon was competing in her first triathlon at the age of 8.


“I wouldn’t have been in the sport without them,” says Bennett, who was the top American finisher (fourth) at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. “Growing up I was super active and my dad and brothers had been in running races. I wanted to be a part of what they were doing.”


Bennett considered going to the University of Florida to focus on running before enrolling at Southern Methodist University, where she swam with six 1996 Olympians from six countries.


“My brothers and my dad influenced me a lot, especially my dad because he was so active,” Bennett says. “I was pretty skinny, so running and swimming were a great fit for me.”


50 USA TRIATHLON WINTER 2011

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124