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over a two-stroke or one-sided breathing pattern. That is a huge decrease in total oxygen flow while swimming. My advice is to include bilateral breathing in your workouts during warm-up, drills, easy aerobic sets and short sprints like 25s and 50s. Switch to one-sided breathing for moderate/ hard-distance and mid-distance sets. If you want to continue working on stroke balance, breathe to the left going down the pool and to the right coming back. The main problem with breathing to one side all the time is that it usually creates a hitch or imbalance in one side. Typically one side becomes a bit stronger and you will veer off course in open water. The main benefit, however, is more air, which is nice when you are trying to swim fast.


Marty Gaal, CSCS, is a USA Triathlon-certified coach. He and his wife Brianne coach triathletes through their company, One Step Beyond. Marty has been swimming in ocean competitions since 1986 and racing triathlon since 1989. Read more about the Powerstroke®: Speed through force and form freestyle technique DVD and coaching services at www.osbmultisport.com and www.powerstroke-dvd.com.


Not Happy with your Swim? ELITETIP


“Swimming is extremely technique-based; therefore, in order to swim fast, first you have to work on proper technique. In the offseason, be sure to practice swim drills every workout — ideally at the beginning and end of your swim workout. Find a coach in the area if you don’t already have one, and have him or her prescribe drills to help your personal stroke. An example of a drill to work on breathing, catch and timing of your stroke is known as catch-up (swim with one arm at a time while keeping the other arm out front and alternate arms each stroke). Good luck!”


Sarah Haskins, 2008 Olympian


We'll get you out of the water faster and with more energy for the rest of your race.


INTERMEDIATE WORKOUT


The purpose of the set is to work pure (short) speed (50s set) in preparation for longer speed efforts in a few months. Sets between the 50s (600 total aerobic) are strength sets (pulling, polo, IM), taxing the muscles but not the heart. These should fatigue your arms as you go through the set so that in the last sets of 50s you really have to focus on holding your stroke technique together while swimming fast. To increase workout volume, you can increase the aerobic sets to 900 total, increase the 50s to 12 in each set, or do more rounds. For less volume, shorten the warm-up to 600, decrease the aerobic sets to 300 total, or just cut out the last round of IMs and 50s.


Barb Lindquist is a 2000 Olympian, a USA Triathlon Hall of Fame inductee and the Collegiate Recruitment Program coordinator for USAT.


WARM-UP: 100 free/50 kick/100 drill/50 kick (3x) Total warm-up: 900 yards. MAIN SET: Move from one set to the next without rest unless otherwise stated. 8x50 — No. 1: 8 strokes fast off each wall. No. 2: middle 25 fast, so pick up speed in middle of pool through turn and back to middle. No. 3: all fast but controlled. No. 4: all easy. Pick interval that gives 9-15”rest and stick with it for the whole workout. 6x100 — Aerobic pulling, slight descend to strong, 1-3, 4-6. Interval with 9-15”rest. Extra 30” rest before next set. 8x50 — Same as above. 2x300 — Aerobic as 50 polo drill/50 fast breast pull with fast flutter kick/50 back x2. 15” rest between and 30” before next set. 8x50 — Same as above. 6x100 I.M. — (fly, back, breast, free) aerobic but free always faster. Can substitute polo drill for fly. Extra 30” rest before next set. 8x50 — Same as above. COOL-DOWN: 100 yards TOTAL: 4,400 yards


“Most race minutes saved per training dollar spent”


Lew Kidder Int'l Triathlon Coach


“Nothing is better than HALO for teaching and training high elbow technique.”


Sheila Taormina Triathlon ITU World Champion '04 Olympic Gold - Swimming '96


Halo Swim Training System


Endorsed by the Feline Triathlon Club www.HaloSwimTraining.com 800-443-8946

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