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NEWS & NOTES
SCOTT, McGILLIVRAY, BRADLEY-COX NAMED TO USA TRIATHLON HALL OF FAME
Six-time Ironman champion Dave Scott, one of the most recognizable names in triathlon history, standout age group triathlete Susan Bradley-Cox and legendary race director Dave McGillivray have been selected to the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame’s Class of 2010, which will be honored at a January 2011 banquet in Colorado Springs.


The third annual USA Triathlon Hall of Fame induction banquet will be held in conjunction with the 2011 USA Triathlon Race Director Symposium on Jan. 15, 2011, at The Broadmoor. The festivities will run from 6-9 p.m., and tickets are on sale now for $50 at http://usathalloffame.racesonline.com/. The event, which has sold out in each of the past two years, will be limited to around 200 attendees.


“USA Triathlon is thrilled to welcome this well-deserving and diverse class into our hall of fame. Susan Bradley-Cox, Dave McGillivray and Dave Scott are outstanding representatives of the multisport lifestyle, and we are incredibly grateful for their contributions to our sport,” said Chuck Graziano, chair of the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame Committee.


About the 2010 inductees:


Susan Bradley-Cox
(age group triathlete)
Arguably the most decorated female age-grouper in U.S. triathlon history, Susan Bradley-Cox is the only athlete to be a member of Team USA at every ITU Age Group Olympic-distance World Championship contested — from 1989-2010. In all, Bradley-Cox has participated in 22 ITU world championship events, earning 18 medals and 11 age group world titles. At the national level, she has competed in 25 USA Triathlon National Championship events and owns 11 national titles. Bradley-Cox was second in her age group at the 1986 Ironman World Championship, setting a masters’ record in the process.


Dave McGillivray
(contributor)
Already an accomplished endurance athlete, Dave McGillivray directed his first triathlon in 1982 — the Bay State Triathlon in Medford, Mass., which drew the sport’s biggest names of the 1980s. Since then, McGillivray has served as the race director for more than 150 triathlons, including the Cape Cod Endurance Triathlon, which debuted in 1983 as what is believed to be the first ultra-distance event in the continental U.S. Additionally, McGillivray directed the second-ever ITU World Championship in 1990 in Orlando, Fla., and the 1998 Goodwill Games Triathlon in New York City. His New England Triathlon Series, which was comprised of one race in each of the six New England states, was one of the first triathlon series in the United States.


Dave Scott
(pre-2000 elite triathlete)
One of triathlon’s most recognizable names, Dave Scott’s career began with inception of the sport in 1976. Scott is a six-time Ironman world champion, crossing the finish line first in Kona in 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986 and 1987. Well known for his epic duels with Mark Allen, Scott was the first-ever inductee into the Ironman Hall of Fame in 1993 and celebrated his induction in 1994 by coming out of retirement to place second in Kona at the age of 40. Scott also finished fifth at the 1996 Ironman World Championship at the age of 42. A native of Davis, Calif., Scott currently resides in Boulder, Colo., where he coaches many multisport athletes, ranging from age-groupers to elites.

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