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Auckland,


New Zealand Throughput: 826,945teu (-4.8%)


With three strategic locations in Auckland, Ports of Auckland is New Zealand’s largest container port by volume and value. It handles the greatest proportion of New Zealand's containerised imports and exports in the Auckland region and also from other parts of the upper North Island and beyond.


Gothenburg, Sweden Throughput: 817,616teu


(-5.1%)


Although throughput at Gothenburg fell by nearly 45,000teu, the decline, at 5.1% year-on-year, was very respectable in light of the global downturn and the weakness of the Swedish currency. It is worth noting that the port handled over one million


20ft ro-ro units (rteu) in addition to 817,616teu of lo-lo containers. There is a move by the port of Gothenburg and the trade association Port of Sweden to encourage the adoption of the term “rteu” in the port world, to enable accurate comparisons of the ro-ro volumes. However, for


Consequently, the port was subject to the effects of the


global downturn and suffered a year-on-year decline of 41,264teu, or 4.8%, in 2009. The port initiated a series of cost cutting measures to


cope with the economic downturn, including staff lay-offs. It is also assessing its process management with a view to improving its performance. The port says it is preparing to address new challenges


and opportunities as shipping lines move back to profitability and begin to reconsider sharing agreements and potentially break-up and regroup, picking new partners and ports. Recent years have seen steady investment in


infrastructure and container handling equipment, such that the port says its foreseeable future needs are adequately provided for.


the time being, the CS Top 100 Container Ports includes only lo-lo volumes. Gothenburg recently took another step towards the


transfer of cargo handling operations to the private sector. Three newly established companies took over the running of terminal operations in the port on 1 February 2010. The move follows a decision by the port’s owner, the City of Gothenburg, to divide the port into a City-owned port authority and three terminal companies to be run by external operators. Yet-to-be-decided external operators will purchase the


right to use quays and terminals at the port although the port authority will continue to own the land and infrastructure and thus control the port and its future development. The port authority says it has noted considerable interest from potential terminal operators from around the world.


Piraeus, Greece Throughput: 661,912teu


(+52.7%)


Greece’s leading container port has made some headway recovering from the disastrous decline seen in 2008, when it handled 431,056teu as industrial action crippled the port. Throughput grew by 228,330teu last year but is still less that half the 1,373,138teu level handled in 2007. Throughput for 2010 is projected to reach between 800,000teu and 1m teu. Industrial action has blighted the port since the


previous government launched the process to find an outside terminal operator and investor for the port. There is also mounting anger at the wider toll it is taking on the country’s business life. Strikes affected the port in 2009 as dockworkers


continued to object to the 35-year concession that will give Cosco Pacific long-term management of two-thirds of Piraeus’ container facilities. Cosco has pledged to boost usage of the port of Piraeus


80 www.cargosystems.net


as well as alluding to future Chinese investments in Greece’s battered economy. The new Pier I container terminal (pictured) started


operations in June this year under the management of Piraeus Port Authority, following an investment of €160m. The 1m teu capacity terminal has a 520-metre quay with an 18-metre draught alongside, equipped with four super post-panamax cranes. A further 320 meters of quay with 12 metres of draught alongside is serviced by three panamax cranes. Following the appointment of new port authority CEO,


George Anomeritis, the port announced in December 2009 that it would continue its freeze on port dues in a bid to restore confidence among shipping lines.


August 2010


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