This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
operator, Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) – the government-owned and largest of two container operators in the port – continues to watch its lead slide. Throughput at KCT slipped 9% to 1,524,602teu


in 2009, compared to a peak of more than 2m teu in 2006. Following the high profile switch of Maersk Line’s


Caribbean transhipment business to Panama’s Manzanillo International Terminal in Colon and Hutchison Port Holdings’ terminal in Balboa, Jamaica Ports Authority ended its seven-year relationship with Maersk’s sister company APM Terminals in 2008. Since then it has struggled to find a suitable partner.


The latest rumours have linked Cosco Group to the government-owned operation. KCT completed its US$231m expansion in 2007,


64 Kingston Throughput: 1,728,042teu


(-9.8%)


A volume decline of 187,909teu in 2009 came on top of a similar drop in 2008, compounding difficulties at what remains the largest transhipment facility in the Caribbean. But without an established international


lifting capacity to 3.2m teu with the arrival of four ZPMC super post-panamax ship-to-shore cranes that took its total crane count to 19. The gantries are designed to handle the largest vessels of up to 22 rows across, but work is needed to bring KCT’s volumes back to 2006 levels. Kingston Wharves, the port’s smaller box terminal,


listed on the Jamaican stock exchange, saw its container volumes slip by 14% from 231,835teu in 2008 to 203,440teu last year. Jamaica Ports Authority is forecasting a 2.9% growth in volumes for 2010.


65 San Juan Throughput: 1,673,745teu


(-0.7%)


There was little change in Puerto Rico’s principal port, San Juan, despite the completion of a second container facility in Ponce to the south of the island. The second construction phase of the Rafael Cordero


Santiago Port of the Americas in Ponce is now complete but it is still struggling to secure its first major customer or a private operator for the facility. Two post-panamax gantry cranes arrived in Ponce in January 2010, but customers have yet to be convinced to


58 www.cargosystems.net


undertake transhipment business in a port subject to the restrictions of the Jones Act. While Ponce struggles to make waves in the Caribbean


transhipment market, San Juan has maintained its grip on cargoes moving to and from the US mainland. The relatively stable demand for food, drink,


pharmaceuticals and consumer goods from the US helped San Juan climb eight places in the Top 100 rankings last year, given the sharp slide in throughput figures elsewhere. Volumes declined by 11,138teu, or less than 1%, to 1,673,745teu in 2009, leaving the port 55,000teu behind Caribbean rival, Kingston, Jamaica. With 43.7ha of space for containers, San Juan remains


Puerto Rico’s main maritime port and now ranks eighth among the top 10 ports in the US.


August 2010


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com