This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
41 Sharjah Throughput: 2,750,285teu


(+9.9%)


Sharjah – comprising Gulftainer’s box-handling activities at Sharjah Container Terminal (SCT) and Khor Fakkan Container Terminal (KCT) – grew by 248,456teu in 2009, representing an increase of nearly 10%. With throughput approaching 2.8m teu, it climbed six places to number 41 in the Top 100. Further growth is expected in 2010 with 3m teu in


sight. KCT, located outside of the Straits of Hormuz, will continue to set the pace as ocean carriers deploy bigger ships and opt to serve the greater region through transhipment services. KCT’s phase two development programme was


completed in 2009, extending the wharf by 440 metres to 1,900 metres and adding four new Liebherr super post- panamax tandem-lift STS gantry cranes. The complex now has 20 STS gantry cranes in service. Gulftainer’s ongoing investment in equipment has


helped it achieve high levels of productivity, with the company claiming to achieve 50 moves per hour per crane. This, it says, means ships are turned around very quickly with ocean carriers’ lost time in schedules often being made up at KCT. Nonetheless, the pace of container traffic growth at


SCT has meant investment there too, with an additional berth, situated at 90 degrees to the current terminal, being used to handle containers. SCT is being dredged to 12.5 metres alongside the


quay and an extra 2,787sq metres of storage area being added in the yard. Additional RTGs and back-up equipment will also be purchased to enhance productivity.


42 Suzhou Throughput: 2,718,000teu


(+5.8%)


Just 35 nautical miles from Shanghai, the country’s ninth busiest box port and the number one Yangtze River hub saw throughput increase by 148,000teu, or 5.8%, over 2008. Its three major port areas, Taicang, Zhangjiagang and


Changshu, contributed 1.51m teu, 870,000teu and 334,000teu respectively to the port’s total container throughput, representing increases of 4%, 6.9% and 9.5% year-on-year. Suzhou port is a beneficiary of the reopening of direct


sea links between mainland China and Taiwan in December 2008, with the city home to approximately 8,000 Taiwanese companies. As one of the mainland sea ports allowed to handle direct cargo to Taiwan, Taicang processed 22,000 teu on the trade in 2009. It aims to lift more than 30,000teu of China-Taiwan containers in 2010.


43 Yingkou Throughput: 2,537,000teu


(+24.6%)


Yingkou shot up 16 places in the Top 100 in 2009, handling 500,600teu more containers than the previous year, up 24.6% year-on-year. The strong growth was boosted by the robustness of


the port’s rail-sea transfer business. Yingkou handled 171,000teu of rail-sea transfer containers in 2009, up 37.7% from the year before. This made up 6.7% of Yingkou’s total throughput. Yingkou is connected to other northern Chinese cities


44 www.cargosystems.net Ongoing major developments at Suzhou include the


Taicang Container Terminal phase III which will have a 1,309-metre quay with four 50,000-tonne container berths able accommodate vessels with a draught of 13.4 metres. With a design capacity of 2m teu, the facilities will bring Taicang’s handling capacity to 6m teu a year. The Rmb3.3bn (US$487m) phase III terminal will be


equipped with a 55.3ha container yard, 12 quay cranes and 30 electrically powered RTG cranes. The equipment will be delivered to the port in 2011.


by a comprehensive rail network and more than 30 regular rail services. There were 13 new domestic ocean liner services added to the port in 2009. In the first four months of 2010, Yingkou recorded a


volume surge of 54.9% year-on-year, lifting 1.11m teu. Rail-sea transfer cargo also rose 133.5% to 79,000teu in the first quarter of 2010. This January, Yingkou, a major coal and iron ore


port in north-eastern China’s Liaoning province, has suffered from the worst outbreak of sea ice in 30 years. The port had to use icebreakers to clear the channel. Yingkou port ordered eight Kalmar DRF450


reachstackers and a DCE80 empty container handler from Finland’s Cargotec in early 2010.


August 2010


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com