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Feature 2 | PASSENGER AND FREIGHT FERRRIES


were followed over the next two years by the Volcan de Timanfaya and Volcan de Taburiente. Te next phase of investment saw the introduction in 2007 and 2008, respectively, of the Volcan de Tamadaba and Volcan de Tijarafe. As a development on the Volcan de


Timanfaya-class, the 154m Volcan de Tamadaba-type was longer and faster, offering a service speed potentially in excess of 23knots. Furthermore, the design had been specified with improved passenger facilities, to raise standards on year-round inter-island duties while also increasing the operator’s flexibility to run short mini-cruises. It is clear that the process of capacity and design enhancement has continued in the Volcan del Teide-led series. Payload increases over the course of the


fleet programme have been such that the new ship has a design draught deadweight of some 4850dwt, compared to the approximately 3350dwt of the Volcan de Tamadaba and Volcan de Tijarafe, and the 2350dwt of the Volcan de Tindaya type. In the sphere of propulsion alone, the


latest progression is substantial. Each of the preceding Volcan de Tamadaba duo employs two Wartsila 12V46B main engines, such that 24 cylinders yield 23,400kW. In the Volcan del Teide, which is just over 20m longer, a total of 28 cylinders encapsulated by four MAN diesels will turn out 33,600kW. In fact, the latest Canarian ro-pax


will provide a new showcase for MAN’s wide-bore design of medium-speed engine, the 48/60 series, produced at the Augsburg plant in southern Germany. Te four examples of the seven-cylinder model, affording individual ratings of 8400kW at a crankshaſt speed of 500rev/ min, will confer the substantial power and attendant reserve to ensure year-round schedules at service speeds of up to 24knots in waters of the eastern Atlantic rim. With her 33,600kW propulsive power plant and hydrodynamically-optimised hull form, the vessel is expected to have a maximum speed of 26knots. The main machinery will turn twin


controllable pitch propellers through twin-input, single-output reduction gearboxes and open shaftlines. Power take-offs (PTOs) from the gearboxes will drive shaſt alternators of 1500kW apiece, giving added effect to the rotational energy


92


Volcan del Teide sets to modernise Naviera Armas fleet.


delivered by the main engines. Te diesel genset installation comprises three MaK 1140kW auxiliaries coupled to Leroy Somer alternators of 1045kW. To assist manoeuvring at restricted berths,


and in strong winds, the vessel is fitted with two 1100kW, electrically-driven Rolls-Royce bow thrusters, incorporating variable pitch propellers. Conditions in the waters around the


Canaries can be rigorous at certain times of the year, prompting the owner to adopt a pair of retractable, Rolls-Royce fin stabilisers in the interests of passenger comfort and cargo security. The high sustainable service speed of


the vessel and her large concentration of power gave added reason for the close attention, which Armas has paid to noise and vibration issues at the design project stage. Copenhagen-based specialist consultancy ScanVibra carried out a noise level prediction using the company’s in-house developed ShipNP soſtware, and undertook analyses for airborne- as well as structure-borne noise transmission in the hull. A key objective was to ensure that the


ship’s interior layout and design concept could be fully realised while achieving weight reductions and minimising vibration. In line with target dB(A) noise levels, systematic decisions were taken on damping and insulation treatments. All sources of noise were investigated, including the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. As well as addressing such issues and


solutions influencing onboard comfort and habitability, the study team looked into the potential environmental impact of the ship on port and harbour communities in terms of radiated noise. As a primary measure, the four MAN


propulsion engines have been resiliently mounted so as to reduce the transmission of vibration and structure-borne noise into the hull. In collaboration with the propeller manufacturer Rolls-Royce and hydrodynamic test and research institute Marin, a careful optimisation exercise has been undertaken for the propellers, shaſt arrangement and aſt underwater body lines. All cargo working in Volcan del Teide


will be over the main deck’s stern threshold, accessed across two stern ramp-doors of 16m length and 8m width apiece, allowing simultaneous handling of two streams of vehicles. Two fixed ramps lead from the main deck (No 3) to the upper vehicle deck(No 5), and a moveable car deck has been incorporated in the ro-ro garage between No 5 and No 7 decks. Cabin accommodation has been laid out


on decks 7 and 8 for up to 482 of the passenger complement. Lounges, buffet, self-service restaurant, bars and other public facilities are also arranged on these two decks, atop of which are the crew’s quarters. Particular attention has been paid to the


design of the public spaces so that travellers, be they tourists or local dwellers, are not only comfortable but also derive a feeling of wellbeing from the sea passage. NA


The Naval Architect September 2010


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