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Feature 2 | PASSENGER AND FREIGHT FERRIES


Te main deck’s strengthening and free


height of 7m allows maximum flexibility in the ship’s payload, including heavy-laden rolltrailers, swap bodies and double-stacked containers. Right forward, a special deck provides for tight stows of cars, vans and SUVs 0 (sports utility vehicles) at a headroom of 2m, reached by hoistable ramp. A fixed ramp on the starboard side of the


main deck enables ro-ro freight transfers to be made to the upper trailer deck, from where the weather deck ro-ro laneage aſt of the forward superstructure is reached by way of a further fixed ramp. Tis uppermost ro-ro deck is certificated for hazardous cargo categories, to be carried in designated slots. Additional, albeit very limited, carrying capacity is provided on the tank top, in an area aſt of the ship’s machinery spaces. Access is by means of a fixed ramp on the port side of the main deck. Specialist manufacturer SP Consultores


supplied the shipset of cargo access equipment as a turnkey delivery, including the stern ramp/door, the side-hinged cover to the lower hold ramp, and the car deck, fabricated as an open steel grating, with its associated, hoistable ramp. Each vessel has a Rolls-Royce Intering anti-heeling system. Jose Maria Entrecanales provides a new


showcase for powerful German wide-bore, medium-speed machinery in the ferry market. Four MAN nine-cylinder L48/60B main engines represent a primary power concentration of 43,200kW. Te vessel also has an exceptionally powerful auxiliary plant, based on three, eight-cylinder L21/31


Engine room onboard Jose Maria Entrecanales.


Jose Maria Entrecanales stops off at tenerife.


diesels from the same stable. The four propulsion engines deliver


maximum output at 500 rev/min, and are distributed between two compartments, one immediately forward of the other. Tese are served by a twin-input, single- output Renk gearbox arrangement in the aftermost engine compartment, whereby the propeller shaſts run on the outboard sides of the two engines in the aſt machinery space. Te gear configuration confers a high degree of flexibility as to usage of the main engine plant, in keeping with considerations of operating efficiency, redundancy and safety. Te MAN propulsion plant satisfies the


need for raw power to meet the demanding nature of a very long ferry route, part of which is along northwest Africa’s Atlantic periphery, that requires the vessel to sustain a significant cruising speed so as to ensure a weekly round-trip. Designed and


manufactured in Augsburg, the 48/60 series in its B version encapsulates advances such as high-pressure injection and variable injection timing (VIT) to minimise emissions of nitrogen oxides(NOx). Te machinery’s performance and efficiency also benefits from the adoption of proprietary, TCA66-model axial-flow turbochargers. The 26knot Jose Maria Entrecanales


blends power and speed with a high degree of manoeuvrability, a factor which also contributes to quay-to-quay operating efficiency and scheduling. Aſt of the propellers on long open shaſts are Becker flap rudders of high liſt, twisted flow type. With two 1350kW Rolls-Royce tunnel thrusters in the bow, the new ro-ro class has a small turning circle and good crabbing properties. Te sizing of the genset installation, using


three 8L21/31 engines of 1935kW apiece, reflects the high electrical load imposed by the reefer trailers. Because of the plant’s added role in cargo care and contribution to delivery condition, the attributes of the auxiliaries have increased significance. Te so-called “pipe-less” design of the L21/31 series includes a cylinder-unit concept, encompassing cylinder heads, liners, pistons, conrods and fuel injection valves. This facilitates changeover with a spare cylinder unit aboard, dispensing with the need to incur unscheduled downtime by breaking a voyage to undertake repairs in the event of a breakdown. While the huge funnel casing is located


three-quarters aſt, on the starboard side, the bridge and accommodation superstructure is positioned forward, with three of its decks providing for the ship’s company of 26 plus up to 12 drivers. NA


88 The Naval Architect September 2010


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