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Feature 2 | PASSENGER AND FREIGHT FERRIES


The two sister vessels have higher payloads and faster speeds.


on the Civitavecchia/Barcelona route by 70% compared with the ships previously used, while reinforcing the cruise ferry standard available to 2140 passengers. Te vessels were subsequently allocated to two of Grimaldi’s new Mediterranean services, on routes linking Porto Torres(Sardinia) with Civitavecchia and Barcelona. Cruise Europa entered service in the


latter part of 2009 as the Mediterranean’s largest cruise ferry, by virtue of the passenger capacity having been upped to 3000, in conjunction with the retained freight vehicle capacity of 3000 linear metres. Under the aegis of Minoan Lines, she and her recently delivered sister have been assigned to the cross-Adriatic traffic. The capability to make 28knots


allows the Ancona/Igoumenitsa/ Patras connection to be accomplished in 22 hours. Notwithstanding the cost premium that an operator has to bear in ensuring high speed, the design’s blend of freight and passenger volume provides a level of scale economy that can underpin competitive pricing policies. The trial speed stipulation was


27knots at the 7.0m design draught, with 76% maximum continuous output from the main engines. It is understood that Cruise Europa attained around 30knots on trials. Te diesel-mechanical installation is based on four 12-cylinder engines of Wartsila’s 46D design, representing a power bank of 55,440kW, and complemented for effectiveness by a hydrodynamically-optimised hull


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form. Drive is to a pair of Wartsila Lips controllable pitch propellers through twin input, single output Renk gearboxes. The loading capacity of 3000 linear


metres for trucks, trailers, coaches and campers is provided on three ro-ro decks, and there is additional space for 215 cars in a dedicated car garage. All cargo and vehicles are handled across the stern threshold of the main deck (No3). The twin Navalimpianti stern ramps occupy almost the full width of the stern, leading directly into the 4.7m-high main deck, which can accommodate 1300 lane-m. One fixed ramp, closed by a


flush-fitting, watertight cover, leads down to the tank top hold, which can be used by unaccompanied trailers and other vehicles. Another fixed ramp in the aft part of the main deck gives access to the 1500 lane-m upper ro-ro freight deck(No5), also designated for campers, an important element in the Italy-Greece traffic. This ramp incorporates a vertical door to meet regulations governing the carriage of dangerous goods. Access from the main deck level to


the special car garage is accomplished through two hoistable ramps, the first leading from the main to the upper trailer deck, and the second from the upper deck. Tis arrangement offers minimum interference to freight handling on decks 3 and 5. Grimaldi has sought to confer an


onboard environment intended to convey standards more akin to a cruise ship rather than those generally associated with ferry


travel. Te public spaces provide a style, quality and variety intended to ensure high levels of passenger receptivity, and to foster enjoyment and expectations of the sea crossing, rather than viewing the ferry simply as a means of making a necessary journey. Genoa’s well known, innovative interior design firm Studio de Jorio was retained for the project. Te public rooms are located on Decks


10 and 11, and the differing requirements of the trans-Adriatic market compared to the western Mediterranean business have fostered a number of changes in the composition and configuration of the public spaces and facilities relative to those on the Cruise Roma and Cruise Barcelona. Also, one of the reasons for the higher


passenger capacity in the Cruise Europa duo, compared with the first two vessels, is the requirement for a larger number of reclining seats for younger travellers. Cruise Europa and Cruise Olympia each provide cabin accommodation for up to 1252 of a total of some 3000 passengers. Fin stabilisers have been fitted in


the interests of passenger comfort and freight security, and these, along with each ship’s two 1850kW bow thrusters, were manufactured by Fincantieri’s own marine equipment division. Cruise Europa’s credentials have been


acknowledged by RINa through the society’s Green Star certification, which identifies ships designed, built and operated to the levels of environmental compliance required by the Clean Air and Clean Sea notations. NA


The Naval Architect September 2010


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