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Feature 1 | SHIPBUILDING IN CHINA


GA of 1700TEU container vessel.


the ship model by 2% through further optimisation of the propulsion system in the laboratory. The experiment on micro bubble drag reduction has also been completed. Both the shipyard and its partners are currently working on the application of the two results in real world construction. Regarding the optimisation of the ‘Sea Sword Bow’ design, a new design has been ready and model experiments are being carried out in towing tank. Also based on the 1700TEU


containership model, CSBC has carried out a study on the impact load of the bow flare to find out how the ship hull shape and structure design can be improved. The current ship design trend of


enlarging the bow flare together with the higher speed of modern vessels has increased the impact force of waves to the bow, which can cause damage to


Breadth


Te corresponding draught for 10tonnes/ TEU x 3770TEU


Ballast water Service speed 74 34.8m 12.8m 11,9000tonnes 23.4knots


the bow structure. As the rule set by classification societies does not provide sufficient information for shipyards to optimise the design of the ship bow to meet ship’s safety and performance requirements in extreme sea-states, addit ional research is required, according to Mr Tseng. CSBC has implemented a three-phase


study using finite element analysis (FEA) where the team added loading onto a bow flare in an experiment, and then compared the experimental result with damage caused to a ship’s structure during actual operations. The research team has analysed the


equivalent static pressure of the impact load according to the classification society rule in the first phase of the test. Then, a wave impact load analysis has been carried out in order to simulate the real world situation. In the last stage, the team will apply the dynamic


37.3m 11.8m 4,350tonnes 23.7knots Result


Reduce draught by 1.0m


Reduce ballast water by 755tonnes


Achieve approximately 6% of energy saving


failure theory to analyse reasons for the ship structure failure. The first two stages have been completed and the yard is running the last phase of the research at the moment.


Ship-size optimisation and tank position New arrangements of ship dimension and the position of tanks have played important roles in the optimisation of ship designs by CSBC. In its latest ship model of 4500TEU


container vessel, CSBC has tried to improve the energy efficiency of an existing design by adjusting the breadth of the vessel. The yard has tested the effect of


broadening the ship breadth from 34.8m to 37.3m without changing the deadweight tonnage and engine horsepower. The actual loads of vessels in general


are around homogeneous 9-10tonnes/ TEU. Under the extreme draught condition, if the load is 10tonnes/TEU, the broadening of the ship breadth to 37.3m can reduce the amount of ballast water required by 7550tonnes. This helps save energy used in the processing


The effects of widening a 4500TEU containership from 34.8m to 37.3m


The Naval Architect September 2010


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