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TECHNICAL PARTICULARS 92,500dwt bulk carrier


Length o,a ......................................229.20m Length b,p ......................................222.00m Breadth .............................................38.00m Depth ................................................20.70m Cubic capacity of cargo holds ...............................110,300m3 Design draught ................................12.50m Scantling draught ............................14.90m Deadweight capacity ...............92,500dwt Main engine ................MAN B&W 6S60MC Service speed ............................ 14.10knots Endurance ....................................22,000nm Number of crane ....................................... 4


cargo and large machinery parts. The bow flare of this multipurpose


heavy liſt vessel is large and its hull form design rather slim, with a V-shape instead of a U-shape, which allows the ship to sail faster. A powerful main engine plus the bow thrusters give the vessel speed and flexibility. It has a second deck-hatchcover and is equipped with an anti-heel system. With its own cranes onboard, operations of the ship will not be limited by facilities at ports, according to Mr Zhang.


Te detailed design of the 30,000dwt


vessel is done by SDARI and the production design by COSCO. Te yard has delivered two vessels of this model and received orders for four more. Meanwhile, COSCO’s technical centre


in northern China’s Dalian is developing its first self-designed model of bulk carrier which will be of 82,000dwt. Te yard hopes to complete the design by 2011, or late 2010 the earliest, said Mr Zhang. NA


manager of shipbuilding technology department, COSCO (Dalian) Shipyard. Ships built by COSCO with better cubic capacities include the 92,500dwt bulk carrier which was designed by Shanghai Merchant Ship Design & Research Institute (SDARI) and has a cubic capacity of 110,300m3


. Another important consideration is


the control of light ship weight. “If the main particulars, service speed and power of main engine remain unchanged, deadweight capacity can be raised by limiting the light ship weight,” said Mr Zhang. One of the most effective ways to


control light ship weight is to use high-strength steel which, if used properly, can enhance cargo capacity and performance of the ship hull, save energy and lower production costs, said Mr Zhang. However, high-strength steel cannot be used extensively because components made of high-strength are smaller, thinner and with high yield stress, thus have poorer anti-fatigue performance, he added. Te selection of the main engine is also


of great importance as the design of the whole power system onboard is based on the main engine, said Mr Zhang. Besides bulk carriers and offshore


units, another major product of COSCO is the 30,000dwt multipurpose heavy liſt vessel, which can carry containers, bulk


The Naval Architect September 2010 +01 440-937-6218 Phone +01 440-937-5046 Fax www.adv-polymer.com 69


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