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Feature 1 | SHIPBUILDING IN CHINA Building a future


China’s private shipbuilding sector is developing a skill base through partnership with foreign organisations. Sandra Tsui reports on the developing expertise at Sinopacific and the company’s latest designs.


S


hip owners look for three basic qualities in a ship: safety, eco-friendliness and


cost-effectiveness regardless of the ship type according to Simon Liang, chairman and CEO of Sinopacific Shipbuilding


TECHNICAL PARTICULARS Tiger FP5000


L o,a ...................................................99.90m L b,p .....................................................92.0m Beam ..................................................17.40m Depth .................................................11.70m Deadweight ....................................4900dwt Design/scantling draft .......................7.00m Cargo tanks .....................................5,000m3 Heavy fuel oil tank ..............................550m3 Diesel oil tank ......................................125m3 Fresh water tank .................................125m3 Water ballast tank ............................1200m3 Speed at design draft ..................... 14knots Main engine consumption at CSR.......12.0t/d For LNG service is abt 13.50knots with fuel oil consumption about 10.0t/d Classification ...............GL 100A5 Liquified Gas Carrier Type 2PG, IW, EP, WBM-S NAV-O  MC AUT


Main Engine .....................MAK 6 M32C Tier II x 1 set or equivalent


MCR 3000kW at 600.0r/min CSR 2700kW at 600.0r/min


Main diesel generators ........... 2 sets x 425kWe (450V, 60Hz, 1800r/min, 3 phase, 3 wire)


Shaft generator ............. 1 set x 400kWe (450V, 60Hz, 1800r/min, 3 phase, 3 wire) /h @ 0.25MPa


Ballast pump .......2 sets x 100m3


Bow thruster ..........................1 set x abt.250kW with fixed pitch propeller


Cargo containment ..............One bilobe and one cylinder independent type C cargo tanks with the material of high tensile carbon steel.


Cargo plant ...............One cargo compressor with one compressor motor; three sets deep-well cargo pumps x 200m3


Accommodation .....Cabins for 16 persons 64


Group, one of the few private shipbuilders that has its own research and development (R&D) department. With two shipbuilding bases in east


China’s Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces, Sinopacific delivered 53 vessels with output value amounting RMB12billion (US$1.77billion) last year. The group designs simpler products on its own and cooperates with partners on the development of more complex ship types such as the Norwegian Ulstein Group and Seattle-based Guido Perla & Associates (GPA), explained Mr Liang. “But when it comes to offshore and


LPG vessels, safety and eco-friendliness become the priorities,” he said. “The recent Gulf of Mexico oil spill has sent a strong message to the industry that these incidents could threaten the stability of a company. Clients are willing to input more in these areas nowadays. When these two criteria are satisfied, shipowners will then look for lower fuel costs and greater deadweight cargo tonnage without compromising on speed,” he added. In meeting the twin requirements


of safe and clean shipping Sinopacific’s LPG tanker design, the Tiger FP5000, has a complete double skin in the cargo hold area, consisting of double side shell and double bottom. An integral upper deck is also in place to give the cargo tanks additional protection and make transportation more economical by reducing leakage of certain types of cargo due to environmental changes. Tis design can also avoid the difficulties


involved in the maintenance of a rubber skirt installed in fully pressurised vessels. Being fully automated with one-man bridge control, Tiger FP5000 needs fewer crew, according to Mr Liang. The LPG ship model complies with


all latest new rules and regulations, such as International Maritime Organization (IMO) PSPC (Performance Standard


for Protective Coating), new convention on ballast water management, revised MARPOL 73/78 regarding NOx etc, European Union (EU) SOx control as well as those to be effective in the foreseeable future, said Mr Liang. Class notation of EP (Environmental Passport) and Green Passport of IMO will also be applied, he added. “Ship owners have shown great interest in our new design of 5000m2


LPG carrier


Tiger FP5000, said Mr Liang. He said the company has received orders for six Tiger FP5000s so far. Te production design of Tiger FP5000 will be completed by the end of this year. Te company has also received 16 orders


for its Crown 63 design, a 63,000dwt eco-friendly bulk carrier which has been certified by Bureau Veritas. Crown 63, the latest bulk carrier


developed by Sinopacific is claimed to be 9% higher in deadweight cargo tonnage but 13% more energy efficient in terms of fuel consumption compared to the 58000dwt bulk carriers generally in the market. “Currently, all our bulk ship models


are self-designed. Te parameters of the 58,000dwt bulk carrier and the latest 63,000dwt bulk vessel are of world class quality,” claimed Mr Liang. Lately, Sinopacific has started its own


independent R&D projects on some of the more complex ship types. “Our first 1800dwt anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessel “SPA80”, with its concept design completed in March this year, is being introduced to the market,” said Mr Liang. “We expect the production design would be finished in October. We have already received orders for 20 vessels of this model.” The company has also led the joint


development projects of LPG vessels of 16,500m2


, 12,000m2


with Nantong United Heavy Industry Co Ltd. NA


The Naval Architect September 2010 and 5000m2


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