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Feature 1 | SHIPBUILDING IN CHINA


Te Singapore-headquartered company,


which is listed on Oslo’s over-the-counter (OTC) market, changed its name on 1 July. CIMC Raffles’ planned investments


include the second phase of an 18m deepwater wharf at its main shipyard located in Yantai. It also plans to build more workshops


at its shipyard in Haiyang, Shandong to enable it to carry out more construction work under cover, thereby minimising the effects of adverse weather on production. It added that a newly acquired


shipyard in Longkou, Shandong, will also be developed into a “world-class construction yard” for building jack-up drilling rigs. Te new yard cost RMB291 million (US$43 million), and is spread over 400,000m2


. “Our long term plan is


to become the number one supplier of Jackup drilling rigs in the world within the next three-five years.” said Deputy Chairman Brian Chang at the time of the acquisition. A representative of CIMC said the


group was negotiating several offshore contracts totalling US$3 billion at present. In February CIMC paid US$75 million


to buy a 75% stake in Friede & Goldman United (F&G), a USA-based naval architecture and marine engineering firm for the offshore drilling market. Sources at CIMC Raffles say that the company is now working on high tech LNG-FPSO designs, something no Chinese yard has won an order for yet.


Qingdao Qingdao is an emerging shipbuilding base with a huge number of yards suddenly making international waves. Qingdao Beihai Shipbuilding Heavy


Industry Co (BSIC) is both the oldest and the largest yard. Established back in 1898, now a part of northern state run yard conglomerate China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation, it made way for the Olympic sailing regatta relocating six years ago to the development zone at Huangdao. Its new premises are enormous, stretching out across 330 hectares, with 9km of coastline, two huge shipbuilding drydocks (500,000 and 300,000dwt), two repair docks (300,000 and 150,000dwt), one


54 China heads for the bigger vessel sizes.


floating repair dock (100,000dwt), four 600tonne gantry cranes plus a 350tonne crane and another crane at 200tonnes. Current annual building production is set at two million dwt, and the business plan mapped out for BSIC sees this former repair and conversion specialist able to churn out 4.7million dwt in the future. Hosco and Indian firms Reliance and Tata Steel are among the yard’s major clients for capesize ships. New products include kamsarmaxes, this year’s in vogue, must have among owners ordering in China. Te 82,000dwt ship is 229m LOA, 32.6m wide with a scantling draſt of 14.5m. Oil giant CNOOC has an offshore


fabricating facility just opposite BSIC and was keen to get BSIC involved in offshore construction but the shipbuilder is understood to have dragged its heels. BSIC is now in talks with McDermott to get into the offshore sector. Te next largest shipbuilder is Qingdao


Shipyard which was recently taken over by the Yangfan Group, a major yard player in the Zhoushan area. Qingdao Shipyard specialises in military vessels and offshore workboats with a slight exposure to small bulkers. CNOOC, Sinopec, Sinochem and PetroChina are main clients outside the navy, though interest is growing in the Middle East with White Shipping from


the United Arab Emirates (UAE) placing a series of tug orders here. The cramped, old facilities in the


centre of town are now accompanied by a new, larger site 90 minutes away. The old yard has a 5000dwt dock and three slipways while the new one, which started last December, is six times larger on 1200 acres with two decent sized docks and a 150,000dwt tanker design being marketed. China’s Wuchang Shipbuilding


Industry’s new shipyard Qingdao Wuchuan Heavy Industry has recently sealed a deal to build four bulkers of 45,000dwt, reportedly with Shanghai Time Shipping, a joint venture between China Shipping Development Co (CSDC) and electricity supplier Huanneng Group. Te newbuildings are said to be shallow-


draſt vessels suited to transporting coal along coastal routes and inland waters. Located in Haixi Bay in Qingdao city,


Qingdao Wuchuan is an offshoot of Wuchang Shipbuilding in Wuhan city, which has been building ships for more than 75 years. Qingdao Wuchuan can build vessels


up to 300,000dwt. Te yard is targeting large commercial ships and offshore vessels such as floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) units and


The Naval Architect September 2010


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