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Feature 1 | SHIPBUILDING IN CHINA


163,000dwt suezmaxes, 300,000dwt and 320,000dwt very large crude carriers (VLCCs) and 388,000dwt very large oil carriers (VLOCs). On 4 January this year, Bohai


launched the largest-ever very large crude carrier built in the country. Te first of two 320,000dwt tankers for BW Maritime carries state-of-the-art green technologies. The LOA of the tanker stands at


Qingdao shipyards increase capacity for a bid to increase orders. Like DSIC is for China Shipbuilding


Industry Corporation (CSIC), COSCO Dalian Shipyard is very much the flagship of the Cosco Shipyard Group. With two newbuild docks plus one of the world’s largest floating docks (300,000dwt) to go alongside its raſt of repair facilities the yard is by quite some distance the largest in the group and the city of Dalian acts as dual headquarters for the group. When the group entered newbuilding three years ago there was a strong focus on bulkers. While COSCO Dalian still has a range of bulker designs for sale – 57,000dwt, 80,000dwt, 92,500dwt and most recently 82,000dwt – it has branched out. Last November it delivered its first multipurpose ship, a 30,000dwt vessel for Chipolbrok as part of a six ship series. Te 30,000dwt Adam Asnyk has dual heavy-liſt cranes with a combined capacity of 640tonnes. COSCO Dalian has strong offshore


credentials too. This July it secured a turn-key EPC (Engineering, Procurement and Construction) contract worth more than US$500 million with Dalian Deepwater Development Ltd to build an advanced and versatile DP3 deepwater drillship. Tis unique vessel, with a hull size of


291m by 50m, is designed to drill wells in international oilfields with high efficiency and safety in harsh environments and at ultra-deep water depths up to 10,000ſt (3050m) and drilling depths exceeding 30,000ſt (9150m). The vessel will have a separate


production moon-pool and its variable deck-load capacity, deck space and cargo


50


storage capacity will be the highest of any drillship ever built. The drillship will be upgradeable for enhanced well intervention capabilities, extended well testing and early field production with one million barrels of crude oil storage capacity. The hull of the vessel and certain


equipment thereon were originally built and installed by COSCO Dalian as part of a floating, production, drilling, storage and off-loading (FPDSO) unit for MPF Corp. Ltd which had sought bankruptcy protection in 2008. Pursuant to the insolvency proceedings that followed, a sale of MPF Corp Ltd’s assets was conducted and the said hull and equipment were acquired by COSCO Dalian pursuant to such sale. Te contract with Dalian Deepwater


Development Ltd became effective on 20 July 2010 and the vessel is expected to be delivered to the buyer in the third quarter of 2012.


Huludao At Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Industry Co increasingly big is best. The Bohai shipyard is located in the city of Huludao some 450km north-east of Beijing. It has a 50,000dwt floating dock plus two huge drydocks, one at 300,000dwt (480m x 107m x 12.75m) and another opened in 2008 that is even bigger at 488m in length and can knock out two million dwt of ships a year. On its menu of ship types are 49,000dwt


product carriers, 180,000dwt capesizes, 6690 and 8024TEU container ships,


331.93m, with 60m in breadth, 21m in designed draft and 22.6m in structure draſt. Regardless of wave factor, the speed can be kept at 16.1knots. Tis huge ship impressed Chinese oil


major PetroChina so much it ordered two plus two options there earlier this year, the first time any Chinese oil major has ordered a VLCC. BW is also behind Bohai’s move into


giant VLOCs. Te VLOCs from Bohai are scheduled for delivery at the beginning of spring 2011 and will become the world’s largest bulk carriers – topping the current world record holder, BW Bulk’s 364,000dwt Berge Stahl. Bohai has other VLOC designs, including 330,000dwt and 363,000dwt. Bohai’s 2008 finished indoor workshop


for block fabrication is one kilometre long with three parallel production lines, so simple maths adds up to 3000m of extra workshop covering some 120,000m2


.


Tianjin Tianjin Xingang Shipbuilding Heavy Industry has signed a bulker order for its new facility. Hong Kong-based Hong Da International this June ordered three supramax bulkers for delivery from September 2011. Te three supramaxes will be the biggest


vessels the 70-year-old, state-owned yard has built. Xingang’s existing facility, some 10km


(6.25 miles) from the new site, can only build ships of below 40,000dwt because of slipway restrictions. Nor can it construct vessels more than 28m wide. Construction of the new facility started


at the end of 2007. It is located in Liaoning Industrial Zone and is almost five times the size of the current site. It is equipped with two dry docks of 510m by 110m that can easily handle ships of up to 400,000dwt.


The Naval Architect September 2010


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