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Feature 1 | SHIPBUILDING IN CHINA Sailing in all winds


Starting in the north in Dalian and heading gradually south to Jiangsu before sauntering up the Yangtze River, Xiang Si takes readers through all the new developments in the northern half of the world’s most populous nation.


Dalian A strong design team and a willingness to take ship orders of all shapes and sizes is what helps fill the five drydocks at Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Co (DSIC), a flagship yard of state run China Shipbuilding Industry Co, the umbrella of northern state yards. DSIC places great emphasis on coming


up with its own designs via its 400 strong R&D department. Owners l ike what they see.


International Fareastern Leasing Co, for instance, has recently signed up for six 81,200dwt kamsarmax bulkers, a self-designed ship type. Likewise its 24,000dwt multipurpose ship design has come in for numerous orders. On a larger scale DSIC, China’s first


yard to export very large crude carriers a decade ago, has recently enjoyed huge success with its super-sized VLCC design. Traditionally, DSIC has built VLCCs to 298,000dwt or 300,000dwt size. However, it decided to develop a 320,000dwt vessel which it claims is the largest deadweight among all Chinese yards. This July SK Shipping of South Korea


ordered a pair of these new ship types, the first time a Korean owner has ever bought such a large sized ship in the People’s Republic. DSIC has spent much time improving productivity levels at its facility whereby it can now knock out a VLCC in just nine months. Only Nantong Kawasaki COSCO Ship Engineering Co (NACKS) is faster in China. Looking ahead DSIC, one of the


nation’s top builders, is anxious to get in on the liquefied natural gas scene. It has completed the design for a new 156,800m3


Qingdao Beihai Shipbuilding Heavy Industry Co (BSIC) makes a statement with its new premises as orders larger ships increase.


Dalian keeps busy with different designs. LNG tanker with


the technical cooperation of British classification society, Lloyd’s Register (LR). The yard also claims that it is developing a 200,000m3


LNG tanker 46


jointly with the Marine Design & Research Institute of China (MARIC), a design company under the wing of China State Shipbuilding Corp. (CSSC). PetroChina is building an LNG terminal just to the north of Dalian; the energy


giant could go local for the ships needed to fill the new terminal. STX Dalian is quickly shedding central


government shackles that had limited the size of vessel construction at the world’s largest shipyard by area space.


The Naval Architect September 2010


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