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standard ferry normally has a maximum of five or six watertight doors between engine spaces - there are only two or three on smaller ferries, Estonia had a total of 22 watertight doors in the hull space. “Tere were three between store rooms


aſt, eight in the engine spaces, two between engine and passenger spaces and seven in the public spaces forward. Te bulkheads in the engine rooms - frames no. 66, A and L - had two doors each - not acceptable for SOLAS standards. Te bulkhead at frame L had in fact three doors fitted, one extra door to the passenger spaces. Bulkheads at frames 80, 91 and 101 also had two watertight doors each, where none should have been fitted (Estonia was a lengthened version of the Swedish flag Diana II - an extra section had been fitted at frame 79 with frame marked by letters A, B, C, etc.)”. According to Mr Björkman one reason


that Estonia had too many watertight doors appears to be that the company had moved the crew from watertight


compartments without watertight doors on deck 1 in the hull to more comfortable cabins in the deck house on deck 8. Te hull compartments on decks 1 and


0, below the car deck were then allocated to passengers, and as they did not like to run up and down stairs to go to the toilets, watertight doors were installed. A swimming pool compartment - with


the pool piping recessed into the double bottom – was also fitted as was a sauna and a conference compartment for passengers on deck 0, which were also interconnected by watertight doors. And at the same time extra doors were fitted between the engine rooms themselves and to the passenger spaces, allowing passengers to walk into the engine rooms through the watertight doors. Tis arrangement with the watertight


doors in the passenger accommodation in the hull also resulted in that the escape arrangements from these compartments being defective. Normally you should have two escape routes (stairs) from any


passenger compartment in the hull – so that if one is blocked by a fire you can use the other route - and it should not lead through a watertight door. Te six passenger compartments in the hull of Estonia had only one correct escape route - the normal stairwell with a door located in the centre of the compartment. On deck 0 two watertight compartments


- for stabilisers and heeling tanks - could only be accessed via watertight doors from adjacent compartments. A correct arrangement would have been direct access from deck 1 or 2. Thus, if the stabiliser compartment was leaking and flooded you could not access it without opening a watertight door which would allow flood water to spread.


Watertight Door Control All watertight doors should be able to be remotely closed from the bridge. Representatives from the German shipyard that built Estonia, Meyer Werſt, have been in correspondence with the Commission,


We provide you with solutions that combine cost effi ciency with sustainability.


Combining cost-efficiency with sustainability Makes the difference Welcome to meet us at SMM 2010, Hall B1.OG, Stand 22 www.deltamarin.com


The Naval Architect September 2010


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In-depth


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