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Tel +49 (40) 2889 2700 Fax +49 (40) 2889 3680 www.industrysolutions.siemen.com


Ancillary equipment Odfjell Group


adds AWT Applied Weather Technology, Inc. (AWT) has announced that the Odfjell Group recently selected AWT’s routing services and onboard voyage optimisation system to help Odfjell enhance safety and efficiency, as well as reduce fuel consumption, costs and carbon emissions. During the first 90 days of implementing


AWT’s optimum ship routing services onboard approximately 65 tankers, Odfjell has had said that it has seen a benefit with a number of vessels steering clear of severe storms, potentially preventing significant ship damage and/or crew injury. AWT was able to show time savings of 30 sailing days and a reduction of approximately 1000tonnes of fuel oil in this 90-day period. This equates to fuel savings of US$475,000 and a reduction in carbon emissions of 3000tonnes. As the period in question did not involve the entire fleet, savings are expected to increase in the future.


Contact AWT Worldwide, 140 Kifer Court, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA. Tel +1 408 731 8600 Fax +1 408 731 8601 www.awtworldwide.com


Ancillary equipment Navis launches


AP4000 autopilot Finnish-based Navis Engineering has announced the launch of its AP4000 autopilot (AP3000 in the previous generation), the JP4000 Joystick Control System/Autopilot (previously JP3000) and the NavDP4000 Series Dynamic Positioning System. The AP4000 autopilot has undergone a


substantial redesign. The front panel has been given a more modern outlook, materials and technology and a 6.5’ high contrast and resolution colour display with the 150degs viewing angle. Besides, the level of front panel protection has been increased from IP44 up to IP67 which makes the AP4000 suitable for outdoor installations (at fly-bridge or port/starboard wings). The user-friendly GUI complies with all the industry


26 The Naval Architect September 2010


ergonomic standards and is very easy to read and operate. Day and night colour palettes are available. The software part of the autopilot has also


been upgraded to include the functionality of network control transfer between up to five network connected control panels. To facilitate the fine-tuning of the autopilot performance, only one parameter, Sensitivity, is used, which allows for covering all the known yawing, steering and counter rudder settings of the autopilots of other brands. Adding to the AP4000 it has a built-in Heading


Monitor System (HMS) functionality which makes it possible to constantly receive and monitor the data coming from two heading data sources (Gyro+Gyro, Gyro+Magn.Compass, Gyro+Fluxgate etc.). Also a further three more control modes have been added. The AP3000 autopilot, the predecessor of the


AP4000 has had the DNV MED-B and MED-D “Wheelmark” type-approval examination. It has also been certified as a Track Control System of the “C” category. Full certification of the AP4000 is expected to be finished by the end of the year.


Contact Navis Engineering Oy, Tuupakantie 3 A, 01740 Vantaa, Finland. Tel +358 (0)9 2509011 Fax +358 (0)9 2509012 E-mail headoffice@navisincontrol.com www.navisincontrol.com


Navis Engineering lauches AP4000.


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