This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
News | EQUIPMENT


Contact Viking Life-Saving Equipment A/S, Saedding Ringvej 13, 6710 Esbjerg V, Denmark. Tel +45 76 11 81 00 Fax +45 76 11 81 01 E-mail VIKING@VIKING-life.com www.viking-life.com


Ship safety WSS announces


test stations Wilhelmsen Ships Service (WSS) is launching a new initiative to assist its tanker operator customers in adapting to new regulations regarding the testing and supplying of fire-fighting foam. The initiative, in which WSS has set up a network of testing stations, follows the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) revised requirements for testing protein-based, alcohol-resistant (PB AR) foam concentrates. “It is important that ship operators do not


compromise the safety of their ships in case of a fire on deck,” explains Katja Eriksen, marketing manager at Wilhelmsen Ships Service. “We are offering free advice on foam concentrates to ensure that our customers’ fire protection continues to be fully effective.” She adds: “Customers can land their foam samples in a port of their choice to be tested by Wilhelmsen Ships Service in accordance with the new MSC 1./Circ.1312.” Martin van der End, product marketing manager


for Fire & Safety Products explained further. “It was found that older types of PB AR foam concentrates may not be compatible with a number of chemicals (polar solvents) and may fail to extinguish a fire in an emergency. Te new test standard combines the traditional test standards MSC/Circ.582 and MSC/ Circ.799 in one standard, amends the requirements for the stability test on acetone and adds a small scale fire test for PB AR foam concentrates, which actually makes the difference in comparison to the traditional test standards that are being superseded by the MSC 1./Circ.1312.” It is anticipated that many, if not all, of the PB


AR foam concentrates presently in use onboard ships could fail to pass if tested in accordance with the new test standard and will therefore have to be replaced.


Contact Wilhelmsen Ships Service, PO Box 33, N-1324 Lysaker, Norway. Tel +47 67584550 Fax +47 67584570 www.wilhelmsen.com


22 The Naval Architect September 2010


Ancillary equipment Flensburger to fit


Hyde Guardian German Shipyard, Flensburger Schiffbau Gesellschaſt, is building two 195m ro-ro ships to Lloyds Register Ice Class and “Green Passport” notation for Rettig Group Ltd. Bore of Finland. Te two ships, to be delivered in May and August of 2011 will be fitted with Hyde Guardian Ballast Water Treatment Systems as specified by the owner. Each Guardian system will have a capacity of 700m3 Bore’s early adoption of the Ballast Water


/hr.


Management Convention’s (BWMC) requirements, vice president marine operations, Mr. Jorgen Mansnerus, stated: “Rettig Group Ltd Bore is committed to operate its vessels in an environmentally friendly, sustainable and economical way. We are constantly looking to improve our ship operations and minimise our environmental footprint - keeping in mind the requirements of ISO 14001. We have been following the ratification process of the IMO BWM Convention – which is expected to enter into force in early 2012.” Mr. Mansnerus continued “As a company


currently involved in a fleet renewal program, we had already identified in 2008 the need to start adopting the requirements of the BWMC. We screened the market for available and type approved technologies and finally decided to fit the Hyde BWMS – as the system had proven reliability and uses no chemicals, which Rettig Group Ltd Bore is trying to minimise in its ship operations. Te Hyde Guardian also offered us a safe technology and low power demand, which are important features for us. Today’s ships are full of complex equipment and systems that we all know require the attention of the operating crew including regular maintenance. We


Flensburger signs up to hyde systems onboard two ro-ro’s.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164