This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
with compliant sewage treatment plant. Accordingly, Hamworthy has followed up with a significant number of orders.


New horizons Now slotting into the company’s water treatment capability is ballast water management – the issue identified by IMO as one of today’s four main concerns in the marine environment. Last year, Hamworthy acquired


Greenship, the innovative developer of the SEDINOX ballast water management, then at an advanced prototype stage. Bringing the operation under its Water Systems division, itself already augmented in recent years through the acquisition of Serck Como, Hamworthy has moved quickly from prototype to commercial offering, and towards the approvals that will bring the SEDINOX system to a wider market. Te Hamworthy SEDINOX management


solution uses a combination of cyclonic separation in its first stage to manage the removal of sediment down to 20 microns, and electrolysis as the means of killing organisms in the second stage. Competing approaches that use first


stage filtering tend to achieve a 50 micron sediment level, which has consequences for power use in second stage treatment. In the second stage of the Hamworthy process, lower power is required and, critically, no chemicals are injected, but the system still achieves a 99.9% disinfection rate of the zooplankton, phytoplankton and bacteria contained in ballast water. In picking out SEDINOX from a range of


possible acquisitions, Hamworthy homed in on the fact that, not only did the technology address the environmental issue at hand; its wider environmental impact could be shown to be less than competing systems through its eco-friendly solution to sediment build up. Hamworthy’s SEDINOX system separates


organic and inorganic matter, preventing particles from passing through the system and being carried to the ballast tanks, where they can settle and a new breeding ground for micro-organisms could be created. Unlike other systems, the Hamworthy approach thus eliminates the particulate matter responsible for settlement. It is sometimes overlooked that the full intention of the Ballast Water Convention


The Naval Architect September 2010 145


is: ‘Control and Management of Ships Ballast Water & Sediments’. Permanent ballast sediment formed in ballast tanks also concedes displacement available for cargo carriage, as well as meaning a higher fuel bill and higher emissions. It may also bring additional disposal costs, if such sediment were deemed hazardous waste. Fur ther demonstration that


environmental concerns touch all aspects of today’s marine market is through the encouragement Hamworthy Svanehøj, Hamworthy’s specialized cargo and fuel pump specialist, is giving ship owners to choose electrically-driven pumps over their hydraulically-driven counterparts.


Hamworthy’s electrically-driven deepwell pumps offer operators a reliable, safe and energy-saving alternative for handling crude product on FPSO/FSO vessels. The company points out that in the


operational phase electric equipment is more environmentally friendly because C02 emissions are cut due to higher efficiency. Hence lower power utilisation, less fuel usage and there is no risk for spillage of hydraulic oil. Significant interest in the merits of electric driven deepwell pump systems has been expressed by tanker owners and builders for crude and clean oil products handling in the Handy-sized to Panamax tonnage range.NA


In-depth


Come and see us at SMM 2010


Hall A1 / Stand 712


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164