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NEWS


in this major project,” said Mr. Tan Bo, Vice President of BPG.


Engines Wärtsilä’s cell mates


go green Wallenius Lines has installed a Wärtsilä WFC20 fuel cell unit aboard the Undine, a car carrier, that will provide 20kW of auxiliary power. Te solid oxide fuel cell technology (SOFC) is powered


by methanol which can be produced from natural gas, or from renewable raw materials such as biomass that has been broken down through a gasification process. Methanol is a commonly used liquid in the oil and process industries, and is available in all major harbours. Tis SOFC power unit is the first of its kind in the world,


and will during the test period provide auxiliary power to the vessel while producing close to zero emissions. “Tis project is an important step towards more environmentally sound shipping,” said a company statement. Installation SOFC aboard the Undine is the result of a


joint project by the international METHAPU consortium which counts among its members Wärtsilä, Wallenius Marine, Lloyd’s Register, Det Norske Veritas, and the University of Genoa, each of whom is globally active in the field of fuel cell system integration, sustainable shipping, classification work or environmental assessment. The project has been funded by the European Union to the tune of €1million and is part of the European Community Framework Programme (FP6). Te principal aim of the METHAPU project has been


to validate and demonstrate new technologies for global shipping that can reduce the environmental impact of vessels. In addition, a further major aim is to establish the necessary international regulations for the use of methanol onboard commercial vessels, and to allow the use of methanol as a marine fuel. Te Undine, with the Wärtsilä FC20 unit installed, sailed


from Bremerhaven in May and from there it headed for the USA, via Sweden and the UK. Te validation process carried out at sea will provide valuable information for the future development of this technology for marine applications.


Environment Collaborate to


innovate In their efforts to reduce the impact of shipping on the


environment, NYK and AP Moller-Maersk have agreed to share ideas on emission-reduction technologies and initiatives. In exchanging knowledge in these areas the companies aim to enable more cost-effective solutions and more efficient implementation of measures required to reduce CO2


, NOx and SOx emissions and other


technologies and substances that impact the environment. To provide a classification society perspective and competence on technology solutions and risk management, Det Norske Veritas (DNV) will be part of the knowledge- sharing process. The companies will exchange ideas mainly in the


following areas: 1. Energy-efficient technologies, including waste-heat recovery and air lubrication


2. Emission-abatement technologies including emission- cleaning systems, systems for operations using low-sulphur fuel, and systems for ballast-water treatment.


3. Alternative fuel, including LNG and fuel cells, as a replacement for heavy fuel oil.


4. Vessel-operation measures, including super-slow- steaming operations, to reduce air emissions and increase fuel efficiency.


In addition to the above, technological exchanges


among the companies will be promoted in a number of other fields.


Wärtsilä’s fuel cell unit WFC20 started its journey in Espoo, Finland and it was installed onboard Wallenius Lines’ car carrier Undine in May.


14


The Naval Architect September 2010


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