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AdvancedManufacturing.org


called Standards, Specs and Schemas to address all mate- rials used in AM, including biologics. The group will within a year publish a roadmap showing


work to be done, America Makes Director Ed Morris said. To be sure, both human tissue engineering and 3D printing are decades old and the absence so far of spe- cifi c standards for marrying human tissue engineering and bioprinting doesn’t mean researchers are on their own in terms of developing best practices. The research on bioprinting is taking place in labs, and


there are existing “good manufacturing” practices for labs in general, said Arnold Bos, a Lux Research consultant. However, he added, “the way that these regulations are set up and updated isn’t always conducive for the develop- ment of bioprinting, since these regulations are established based on known practices and technologies.” Bos said he kows scientists who’ve seen representa-


tives from the FDA attending bioprinting conferences. “The FDA doesn’t really have a good place to put 3D printing for tissue engineering, and it’s the same story in Europe,” he said. The FDA is “reaching out to research groups” to ask what should be regulated and what risks should be considered. Some fi rms aren’t waiting for word from a government. Gatenholm said Cellink set a standard of its own in the absence of formalized best practices: “BPU,” short for “biocompatibility, printability, universality.”


BPU, he explained, governs making products that: đƫ biointegrate with no infl ammation, in the case of bioink and tissue;


đƫ possess enough versatility to print complex structures, and


EASTERN ALAN BERG


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This Index to Advertisers is published as a reader service. Although every eff ort is taken to assure accurate listing, no allowances will be made for error or omission. 63


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MIDEAST (Detroit) DEAN DIMITRIESKI One SME Drive Dearborn, MI 48128 Phone: 313-268-0597 E-Mail: ddimitrieski@sme.org


đƫwork with a wide range of cells, in terms of bioink and bioprinters.


MicroFab’s Wallace summed it up neatly: “You could call


almost everything going on today the discovery of best practices,” he said. “Not only are best practices non-exis- tent, that’s what the research is for.”


AD INDEX


ABB Inc-Robotics, 17 Autodesk, 45 Capture 3D Inc, 40 CMS Research Inc, 42 Deltek, 25 FANUC America Corp, Cover 3 Fujitsu Glovia Inc, 19 Hewlett Packard, 11 Hurco North America, 9 MachiningCloud, 21 Marposs Corp, Cover 2 Mazak Corporation, Cover 4 Plex Systems, 13 Poka Inc, 46 Promess Inc, 7 Renishaw Inc, 33 Schunk Inc, 30 Siemens Industry Inc, 5 SLM Solutions NA Inc, 27 SME/SMART Manufacturing Seminar Series, 39 Stratasys Direct Manufacturing, 3 Universal Robots USA Inc, 35 ZEISS Industrial Metrology LLC, 43


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SMART MANUFACTURING August, 2016, Vol. 001, No. 2 is published by SME, One SME Drive, Dearborn, MI 48128. Telephone 313-425-3000 Fax: 313-425-3417. Canada Post Publication Mail Sales Agreement No. 40732015. Postmaster: Send address changes to Attn: CDC, Smart Manufacturing, PO Box 930, Dearborn, MI 48121-0930.


Summer 2016


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