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SIMULATION SOFTWARE


Barry Christenson, director of product marketing, Ansys Inc. But across industry in general, there has been high growth for the company outside of its traditional users, he said. “It’s important in areas like forming for automotive,


The VERICUT Reviewer is a stand-alone simulation viewer that does not use a license. The Reviewer can play forward and backward while removing and replacing material. You can rotate, pan and zoom just like normal VERICUT, and the cut stock can be measured using all the standard X-caliper tools. The “Reviewer” file can be saved at any point in a VERICUT session.


where you have concerns about metal thinning and stresses on a product,” he said. “For a deep-drawing process, you’d want to go through simulations, if there’s a concern about tearing.” Designers of cutting tools also simulate their designs with the software. “One of the problems is heat tends to destroy cutting tools,” Christenson said. A lot of CAE work is in traditional manufacturing areas, with metalcutting, metalforming and high-speed machinery users concerned with motion, friction and heat, he said. In its most recent release, Ansys 17.1, the company addressed other manufac- turing areas like composites and understanding the manu- facturing process related to curing of composites. Editor in Chief Brett Brune contributed to this report, a


version of which was published in the June 2015 issue of Manufacturing Engineering magazine.


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1 (844) 310 POKA www.poka.io/smart


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Summer 2016 Photo courtesy of CGTech


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