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SIMULATION SOFTWARE


On the cutting edge Being able to accurately simulate the metalcutting pro-


cess before ever cutting is key. With the latest high-end NC simulation solutions, manufacturers ensure the program- ming for their complex multitasking machines and five-axis machining processes are accurate, with no risks of harming expensive equipment or workpieces with collisions. Using true G-code simulation in the NC cutting pro-


cess gives manufacturers the most realistic visualizations possible. “Simulating NC programs in a virtual machining en- vironment prior to running them in the physical workshop is endemic and spans manufacturing automation from process concept to shop floor,” said Bill Hasenjaeger, product market- ing manager, CGTech, developer of the Vericut NC simula- tion, verification and optimization software. “Our customers use Vericut’s ... simulation for process design tasks such as CNC equipment concept design and evaluation prior to purchase, CAM programming system evaluation, design-for- manufacturing review sessions, machining strategy analysis and decision-making, and as an aid in workholding design, all prior to production NC programming activities.


CMS Software


Providing solutions for flexible automation for 35 years


Software that Makes Machine Cells Work for You


đƫAutomates the dataflow between factory computers and the automation controllers


đ Generates a daily schedule from the work orders đ Serial number tracking and reporting of material


For more information, go to www.cmsres.com/www/whitepaper.html and download the white paper “3 Ways to Reduce Manufacturing Costs up to 40% in Automated Cells”


1610 S. Main Street Oshkosh, WI 54902 920-235-3356 cms@cmsres.com www.cmsres.com


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“Once the design, tooling and fixturing are set then the usual simulation production benefits of machine/tool/ fixture/workpiece collision-checking, workpiece dimen- sional validation, and machining optimization are realized,” Hasenjaeger said. “Then downstream in the workshop, the results of Vericut’s simulation are used to document the machining process and as an aid for part inspection for shop floor personnel.” Suppliers of factory equipment are acknowledging and rushing to fill the needs for pre-process simulation as well, he said, making 3D models of their products generally available to end users. With the latest Version 7.4 Vericut, users can simulate any metalcutting CNC process. Machine tool movements can be simulated while stepping or playing backwards in Vericut’s free Reviewer application, which is also available for the iPad. “Simulation system end users are ... beginning to recog-


nize that process analysis features within the simulation are maybe the most important feature of any simulation system,” Hasenjaeger said. “It’s easy to lose sight of this fact in the very visual world of machining simulation and the animation of the machine. Pretty pictures are nice, but process simula- tion is an engineering analysis tool. It doesn’t matter how nice the images look if the simulation is unable to alert the user of process problems. Unfortunately, some software simulation methods reduce accuracy for faster simulation speed while hiding unrealistic flaws with graphics shading ‘tricks’—not only are the flaws hidden, but so are process errors.”


An NC simulation


in CGTech’s Vericut software offers us- ers highly realistic visualizations based on G-code data of an automotive camshaft cut on a Mazak Integrex machine tool.


Summer 2016


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