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MULTITASKING Multitasking machines not only enhance productivity but also improve quality


Machining parts complete in one clamping


Jim Lorincz Senior Editor


T


he appeal of multitasking machining is easy to under- stand. Multitasking machines overcome some limitations of conventional machines and work their own special


brand of magic in subtractively processing parts. From the earliest mill-turn machines to today’s most advanced multifunction machines featuring simultaneous process- ing, manufacturers have recognized that productivity-enhancing multitasking ma- chining and quality go hand in hand. The ability to drop parts complete in one clamp- ing from one machine removes accuracy-


robbing reclamping on a second machine and provides flexibility to quickly change over to meet short-run production demand. Innovative machine configurations and flex- ible workholding are expanding the limits of future multitasking machines.


Testing limits, pushing boundaries “One of the primary goals of multitask- ing machine development is to minimize any tradeoffs,” said David Fischer, lathe product specialist, Okuma America Corp. (Charlotte, NC). “Customers don’t want to give up any milling capabilities on their multitasking lathes and they don’t want to give up any


ICON Technologies’ ICON 6-250 Produc- tivity Center combines flexible machining center principles with Hydromat’s rotary transfer production philosophy. The ICON 250 Series is designed for larger workpieces like those for automo- tive manifolds and ABS parts.


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Photo courtesy ICON Technologies, Div. Hydromat


Summer 2016


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