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this stretch of roadway. I was leaned into a left hand bend, quickly applying my brakes, when I saw a couple bikes in our group on their side stands and a couple on their sides in the bushes on the downhill side of the road. All the riders were up walking about and surveying the situation. Apparently one rider overshot the turn while the other bike was parked, and another rider wasn’t look- ing and bumped the stationary bike, top- pling it onto its side. Four eager helpers pulled the first bike


from the bushes as two others uprighted the other bike. Very little damage was done to either bike, and the riders were totally unscathed. This reinforced my confidence that maybe all the bad luck was behind us. About a half-hour later we came upon the area of missing pavement and deep ruts. I worked myself around the saplings and quickly spied a deep rut in front of me. I picked my route on the ridge of two caverns and gave it the throttle, but my wheel slid right down into the sharp drop, which forced my throttle hand to propel my bike up into the air towards a group of bushes on the downhill side. I exited Old Yeller half- way to the bushes and landed on my back. There’s that moment you’re happy every- thing has stopped, and after a quick self- assessment, I felt obligated to jump up and yell to the other riders “I’m fine!” The next piece of business was extracting


my machine from the bushes and getting it upright. Within minutes our now experi- enced rescue crew had my bike between my legs and powering out of the rough shoul- der on my way to San Nicolas, where we all stopped to regroup before getting onto the wide M-16 to Basaseachic. The last couple riders pulled up, but one came too close to the rider on my left, bumped side bags with the rider on his left, and next thing I saw was the last rider on the pavement with his bike pinning him down. It happened so slowly, but once again the rescue team came running over. Our laughter slowed the extraction process, but we got the bike lifted, the rider safely freed, and the exhausted group motored down the road, smiling at the calamity of events. Creel was too far to reach before dark, so


we stopped at the El Rey Motel in Yecora to rest after a day’s dose of 200 miles of moun- tainous navigation with spills and thrills. I couldn’t find the bed quick enough.


WANTED Motorcycle Technician


Frank’s Motorcycle Sales and Service in Essex, VT has an open position for a qualified, self motivated individual who communicates well and values customer satisfaction to join our award winning service department. Minimum two years dealership


experience. BMW certification is pre- ferred but not mandatory. Must have technical and diagnostic experience, computer and time management skills, reading and comprehension of both paper and online manual formats and be very detailed oriented. If these traits sound like you, apply


www.kamran@fransmotorcyclesales.com


today to join our growing team. To apply email:


kamran@franksmotorcyclesales.com


www.motoworkshighlights.com


www.nextadvwealth.com


June 2016 BMW OWNERS NEWS


89


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