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my cognitive functions more or less intact. I stood up to wave to my crew and knew then my right knee was pretty jacked up. My teammate Ben Walters pulled over and gave me Eva to ride back to the pits while he picked up Brunhilde. Those were the last steps I took for three weeks. Hilde survived remarkably well consid-


ering the violence of the crash—some bodywork, a radiator, a clip-on tube, a new front stand receiver. Over the next couple of weeks Tim and Melissa fixed her up while I hobbled around and felt sorry for myself.


USNE CMRA /


New Orleans, Louisiana June


20, 2015 The AOD has, with scant exception, been


a pretty scrappy operation, staffed, crewed and ridden by folks that all have day jobs. That meant rolling up to the track the morning of the practice day after an all- night, swing shift-driven interstate blitz. Departure times from D.C. are established by the number of hours of travel required to arrive at the track, rounded up to the


nearest non-rush hour afternoon or eve- ning time. All the races in 2015 were full day drives (24-28 hours), and we tried to make the best of it with dinner in the French Quarter. Friday morning was disheartening. Chris


Peris had acute food poisoning and couldn’t stand up, so that left us with Ben Walters as our sole rider, as I still couldn’t put weight on my right leg. Brunhilde was back to her old tricks and handling poorly. To top that off, it was very hot with violent thunder- storms and an infestation of cadaver millipedes. Slowly we resolved our issues. Our


Michelin representative, David Hirsch, put forth Kyle Ohnsorg as a rider. Kyle was fast and earnest, and charmingly, was so young that he had never heard of Army of Dark- ness. He just saw a bunch of old guys with a trailer full of beat up pit equipment. Chris was able to join us at the race track


on Saturday morning, but he was still pretty weak and couldn’t ride. Ben pronounced the bike good enough to race after the morning warm-up. Kyle went out on his 600 and took a convincing win in the solo endurance race.


We had to adapt to CMRA rules, such as


speed limits in the pits. That makes each pit stop a longer event. Unlike WERA, CMRA does not allow parallel processing of refuel- ing and tire changes. Fueling has to be done without anyone else working on the bike. We can usually change a rear tire as fast as we can refuel the bike; however, if we are not allowed to do these at the same time, we pay a 25-second penalty for changing tires, and we pretty much have to change tires at every stop because 186 rear wheel horse- power plays hell with tire life. Also, even though our tank holds over seven gallons, those big engines drink fuel, so we need to pit for fuel at about an hour. CMRA bikes have been adapted to the rules so they mainly run 600s, big tanks, and hard tires. That setup allows them to skip as many pit stops as possible. Due to the pit rules, liter bikes do not generally do very well in CMRA, and the 600 team Village Idiots has dominated the series for years. I figured each of our pit stops would be


longer than the Village Idiots’ due to tire changes, and we would need to make one


Ben Walters and Brunhilde lead a group of frustrated 600 riders early in the race at NOLA. We become what we hate. 74 BMW OWNERS NEWS June 2016


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