search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
keepemflying


“check point” that has been built at the main highway turn-off where you start up the road to Palenque (a town with some of the best Mayan ruins which has become quite a tourist attraction). Both times I visited Palenque, coming and going on this trip, I had to open one of the saddle bags and show my bike papers and passport. I gather that this is related to a long history of unrest in the Chi- apas area. Mexico is no longer what I would


consider to be a “cheap place to go.” The higher cost of gas and the toll roads added up to higher travelling costs as I moved around. Hotels ran from $9 to $30 a night, with a couple of exceptions in both directions. Food was a little less than here in the U.S. but still cost a fair amount. I was constantly buying water and other drinks to stay hydrated, and those are


a bit less expensive below the border. I am quite sure there are still small beach towns where one can camp on or near the shore or rent a palapa for a few dollars. Tulum used to be that way when Susanna and I stayed there in 1995; now it is the “Mayan Riviera” and crowded with big hotels. I would pull three to five thousand pesos from a banco “caja automatico” every three to five days, using my at-home debit card. We did alert our issuing bank here before I left to avoid them cancelling the card when Mexican withdrawals started appearing in our account. I have been home ten days now and still


feel a bit beaten up from the trip. Both com- ing and going, it was one of the colder Mex- ico runs I have done, and of course, I’m older every time I head south. I’ve changed the oil in the “Mexico Bike” and swapped Susanna’s bag mounts back to her bike. I also installed a two-piece set of mounts that came with some bags I purchased recently


on eBay. Now I have to hunt up the tail piece that bolts onto the rear of those mounts. It WAS very handy to have the extra place to tie gear on. The bike needs a new timing chain rather


badly. I’m reasonably sure that the bike is running the original timing chain. It runs just fine, but there sure is a lot of rattling and clattering when the bike is idling. I really want to quiet things down and have a nice smooth idle. After all, that is part of the “airhead experience.” Two of Susanna’s grandsons are coming out from Connecti- cut to spend their spring break with us. While actually riding the bikes is out of the discussion (per both mom and grand mom), I plan on showing the 12- and 14-year-olds the basics of caring for airhead BMWs. I had to wait until I was 18 and had a job before I could buy my first motorcy- cle. So can they, if they are inclined to do so, and I will help with that decision making process.


www.beemershop.com


48


BMW OWNERS NEWS June 2016


TECH


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144