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PRoductreviews Watershed Drybag By Michael Anthonijsz #146759


THIS PAST SUMMER, FOUR MOA members tackled Asia on their own and rode from London to Vladivostok and back to London again, hugging the Hindu Kush mountains along the Afghan and Chinese frontiers. A cou- ple of companies asked us to field test and comment on new products for the adventure rider. One of these was Watershed Drybags of Asheville, North Carolina. Watershed focuses on the camping, hunting, sailing, canoe- ing and military markets, but this will probably change as these bags are excellent for motorcycle use. Three of the guys used two Colo-


rado dry bags for the top of each pan- nier, and one used a Maritime Utility Pouch as an addition to his backpack. The other fellow used his trusty Ort- lieb bags, so we had a good opportu- nity over the course of a few months and 24,000 kilometers of difficult roads to test these bags.


Watershed’s Chattooga bags were loaded


on top of each pannier. Brando Gritti and I filled ours with clothes, so that if we needed something, it afforded us quick and easy access without opening our Zega and Metal Mule bags. Bill Hooykaas kept his Alpine- Star jacket, heated jacket, evaporative cool- ing vest, Tilley hat and sneakers in his so he could switch up quickly as the weather dic- tated without opening his Metal Mules. The bag has a Zipdry triple press seal over the whole length and an optional relief valve to purge excess air, using the two attached compression straps. This is a good feature, making it the most compact size possible once all the air is expelled. The attention to detail is evident, as even


the relief valve is partly protected so it will not get hung up. All other waterproof bags that I have come across come with a zipper, but they all lack 100 percent water tightness. These bags have buoyancy and simply will not let moisture in or air out. We dropped the bikes many times while


riding in the desert, and I can attest that the bags are tough as nails. They have to be, since they are also marketed as maritime tactical gear in MilSpec grade, meaning they are made of military-grade materials, from the bag itself to the triple ZipDry seal closure to the rugged lash points and the carrying straps. I used the Maritime Utility Pouch with


webbing on the back of my backpack, rely- ing on its 100 percent waterproofness to contain all my important papers. This pouch came from the military line and is a grade stronger than the regular, which is already super tough. Bill used the larger Colorado bag as


checked baggage; he put his helmet, boots and bike clothing for the flight to Europe and back in it, and it proved to be perfect as a tough piece of luggage that folds up for easy storage. All the bags come in various bright and subdued colors; Watershed makes a whole range of bags to suit every need, and each one has six tie-down points.


member tested


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