search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
See Your Generosity in Action through an IRA Charitable Rollover Gift If


you are 70½ years old or older and live in the USA, you can take advantage of a simple way to benefit Hindu Heritage Endowment and receive tax benefits in return. You can give up to $100,000 from your individual retirement account (IRA) directly to a qualified charity such as HHE without having to pay income taxes on the money.


Tis law no longer has an expiration date, so you are free to make annual giſts to HHE this year and well into the future. WHY CONSIDER THIS FORM OF GIVING? • Your giſt will be put to use today, allowing you to see the difference your donation is making.


• You pay no income taxes on the giſt. Te transfer generates neither taxable income nor a tax deduction, so you benefit even if you do not itemize your deductions.


• If you have not yet taken your required minimum distribution for the year, your IRA charitable rollover giſt can satisfy all or part of that requirement.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


Q. I have already named Hindu Heritage Endowment as the beneficiary of my IRA. What are the benefits if I make a giſt now instead of aſter my lifetime?


A. By making a giſt this year of up to $100,000 from your IRA, you can see your philanthropic dol- lars at work. You are jump-starting the legacy you would like to leave and giving yourself the joy of watching your philanthropy take shape. Moreover, you can fulfill any outstanding pledge you may have made by transferring that amount from your IRA as long as it is $100,000 or less for the year.


Q. I’m turning age 70½ in a few months. Can I make this giſt now? A. No, you cannot. Te legislation requires you to reach age 70½ by the date you make the giſt.


Q. I have several retirement accounts—some are pensions and some are IRAs. Does it matter which retirement account I use?


A. Yes. Direct rollovers to a qualified charity can be made only from an IRA. Under certain circum- stances, however, you may be able to roll assets from a pension, profit sharing, a 401(k) or a 403(b) plan into an IRA and then make the transfer from the IRA directly to Hindu Heritage Endowment. To determine if a rollover to an IRA is available for your plan, speak with your plan administrator.


Q. Can my giſt be used as my required minimum distribution under the law?


A. Yes, absolutely. If you have not yet taken your required minimum distribution, the IRA charitable rollover giſt can satisfy all or part of that requirement. Contact your IRA custodian to complete the giſt.


Q. Do I need to give my entire IRA to be eligible for the tax benefits?


A. No. You can give any amount under this provision, as long as it is $100,000 or less per year. If your IRA is valued at more than $100,000, you can transfer a portion of it to fund a charitable giſt.


Q. I have two charities I want to support. Can I give $100,000 from my IRA to each? A. No. Under the law, you can give a maximum of $100,000. For example, you can give each orga- nization $50,000 this year or any other combination that totals $100,000 or less. Any amount above $100,000 in one year must be reported as taxable income.


Q. My spouse and I would like to give more than $100,000. How can we do that?


A. If you have a spouse (as defined by the IRS) who is 70½ or older and has an IRA, he or she can also give up to $100,000 from his or her IRA.


It is wise to consult with your tax professionals if you are contemplating a charitable giſt under the extended law. Start your estate plan by downloading the pdf file at www.hheonline.org/tool-kit.shtml.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85