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Brahman, with Truth Itself, the un- changing, eternal Reality, and is freed from the suffering of limitation. This immortality, or identification with Brahman, gives rise to fearlessness and bliss. The Kena Upanishad corroborates this attainment:


It (Brahman) is really known when It is known with (i.e. as the Self of) each state of consciousness, because thereby one gets immortality. (Since) through one’s own Self is acquired strength, (therefore) through knowledge is attained immortality.


What is consciousness?: )öï ö öï


öQ S1 ï ï The ­ ö ó ïSï 1 õ õï 3 ïR ïó õS 1 ï ï 1 1I Rô ^ô3 3 õô S J V+ * 1ö ó also 3 Z*ô ] S - edge) is (the means of) immortality,”


and also, “I believe that Self alone to be the immortal Brahman… Knowing (It), I am immortal.” What is that person like who sees


this Consciousness in all? How does he behave? The ! ö *


simple description: “He is ôL ô 5 ô ^


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out desires.” Desirelessness is the quality ô S 3ôô


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of the Self. If he knows himself to be ^


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desired, for he already has and indeed is everything. The ) S * 1ö ó describes him as fearless: “The enlight- ened man is not afraid of anything after realizing that Bliss of Brahman, failing to reach which, words turn back along with the mind. Him, indeed, this re- 3ô õ ô3 _


J W. U õ õ ! Brain & Mind


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Glimpsing the New Science of Consciousness ï1 ö ï


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or at least two thousand years thinkers have tried to explain the human mind and disagreed heatedly, but a consensus has ôõ


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is harder to hunt down than the mythical unicorn, because the hunter and the hunted are the same. This frustrating obstacle has led to speculation that swings between two extremes—at one extreme, consciousness is pure illusion created by brain chemistry. At the ô ôT ô


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cannot land on dry land as a way to peer under the sea. Both are cat- egorically impossible. % 3 U õ


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tempt to unravel the intricacies of the mind by dissecting the intrica- cies of the human nervous system. We hold that mind doesn’t need the brain in order to exist. It precedes all living things by being fun- damental to the universe. In other words, human beings are part of a conscious universe. 'Rô


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though it began as a ridiculed fantasy. Some leading cosmologists are circling back to the insights of quantum pioneers like Max Planck and Erwin Schrödinger. Planck declared that it was impossible to “get


56 hinduism today april/may/june, 2017 õ


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behind” consciousness, meaning that it can’t be explained by refer- ring to anything more primal. Schrödinger held that consciousness cannot be subdivided; there is only one consciousness, even though it appears to be subdivided into billions of individual minds. To use an honored analogy from India’s Vedanta tradition, pure gold can be õô


ô ô 3 ô 5 õK Planck, Schrödinger and their like-minded colleagues never pur-


sued this line of investigation very far, being consumed with the new frontiers of quantum mechanics and the challenge to create a com- plete account of microscopic phenomena. Today, the physicists who are circling back can take advantage of brain science, which gives them a continuous view of mind, from the biggest to the smallest, from the entire cosmos to the subatomic particles that constitute all ô


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with a tag line: Consciousness is a state of matter. However, this view 3


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foremost, arriving from the quantum vacuum carrying information, which then becomes one of the primary trademarks of conscious- ness. By transferring and building up more complex information structures, one arrives at the human brain and its potential for creat- 5 ^


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plaining the mind. Its predictions and theoretical approach have ôô 3ôõ 3


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perspective of the thinker who is wielding the theory. But there is a consensus on the necessity of mathematical models. This is where Tegmark has fascinated his peers, because—totally believing in mathematics as the ultimate model of reality—he wants to rescue the materialist view by positing that matter can have the property of consciousness. His ambitions are, quite literally, cosmic. He wants to


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pends on how powerful their information processing becomes. Quantum physics is a two-edged sword when it comes to ex-


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