search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
The Brahma Samaj believes in six com-


mandments of Paramatma, God: 1) keep the universe always clean; 2) treat all creatures equally and try to solve their problems; 3) of- fer sweets and scented articles to the fire and let others also offer; 4) chant õ


ö S 1Q Sï


- -


öZ 5) bear the light, S , in the eye or on


the forehead faithfully; 6) be attached to He Who is omniscient. While rooted in tradition, the young tribal


women of Brahma Samaj seemed educated and modern in their outlook. Many were us- ing mobile phones to take videos and click pictures of our visit. ' ^ õô3


ô õ U S 3 ô


Bathou Temple. As happened at the Brahma Samaj temple, we were greeted not as a re- porter and photographer, but as honored guests. Over a hundred temple members and ô


^ 3 ô ñ % *


were there to welcome us, beginning with the traditional Bodo dance, Baguramba (see photo on page 18). The temple was simple, an open hall with


the sijou plant representing the Bathou God in its bamboo enclosure at one end. The wor- ship, on the other hand, was quite elaborate, in part because, in addition to Bathou, many


Brahma Samaj Assam: X 3ö E


P ! õ 1 ï 3 S # ó ï õ ï õï 1 3 öï


J ñ ï Q 1ö 3


1


Q ö Z óïP ï ï 31


öï ö J ­ ö


" 3ö # ïï1 1 ï ó 3Z


Z ï 3 ïï


ó ï1 ï


ï ó


Q 1ï ïó


ö J ï 1


Q ó öï ï öï ñ


ñ 1 ó 3 ï


öï Weavers’ art: öï 1 11 V1 Q - Qï Pï 1 Q 1 ïP óï ïPï SQöï ï


as I worshiped Bathou God. This was the ^ 3


ô ! ô ôõ õ ô ô 3


of the tribal lands and experienced the pow- er and faith of tribal people. Many regard Bathou God as Lord Siva, others do not. But as a Saivite, I found this worship profound and more than uplifting enough to make me forget the grueling day we were completing with seven hours on the road. I had been al- lowed a glimpse into the mystic life, tradition and culture of this colorful community of Assam who live so close to the divine.


The Brahma Dharma Jyoti Mondir


other tribal Gods and Goddesses were there to be honored. All the eighteen sacred items in the open around Bathou God were sym- U


ô ôõ 3 ô ^ ô33 S Rô õ3K


The rites were is accompanied by constant bhajan and kirtan. ! 3 õ ^ ôT


Rôõ ! S 3


Education Projects Education with a Hindu slant was one topic we were tasked with documenting in Assam. We got quite a sampling, ranging from a driving academy and sewing training center to the one-room schools of Ekal Vidyalaya in remote villages and the Shankardeva Vidya Niketan, a premier Guwahati school popular with parents for its high standards and Assamese ethos. These schools are privately funded and do not take government money. All try to instill in students love of country and devotion to the Hindu traditions. Jan Kalyan Trust, associated with


the RSS, operates vocational schools across India, one of which was the driving school


in South Guwahati.


Bharat Kumar, an RSS lifetime worker, founded it in response to a lack of Hin- du drivers in a profession dominated by Muslims. He told us of multiple problems from harassment of Hindu passengers to difficulties with full- time drivers working for Hindu fami- lies resulting in cases of “love jihad,” where a daughter drawn into marriage


is forced to convert to Islam. At Jan Kalyan’s small sewing school in


Shankardeva Nagar, the students welcomed us with Vedic chanting and bhajans they are taught as part of the curriculum, along with basics of Hinduism through a book in Assa- mese, óï


ó


they had designed and sewn themselves— 3


5 3


õ ô3 Sô ô Sô 3


ôU ô ^ õ


5 33 5


ô


ô3ô ^ 3 ô


ôK ï. Ladies enthusiasti-


cally showed us the various Assamese ethnic motifs the use in their embroidery work. % U


28 hinduism today april/may/june, 2017


all photos: thomas l kelly


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85