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&ôRô ôRô 3 S 3ô


Sri Ramakrishna once went to see a religious drama produced by his disciple. The curtain went up and a character started singing the praises of the Lord. Sri Ramakrishna immediately began to enter the supreme state of consciousness. The stage faded; the actors and actresses faded. As only a great mystic can, he uttered a protest: “I come here, Lord, to see a play staged by my disciple, and you send me into ecstasy. I won’t let it happen!” And he started saying over and over, “Money... money... money,” so as to keep some awareness of the temporal world. Eknath Easwaran (1910-1999), spiritual teacher, author


If I cannot be the maker of my own fortune, then I am not free. But if this is not my


DID YOU KNOW?


Three Types of Karma Contributions from Swami Sivananda’s essay on karma


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rarabdha, kriyamana and sanchita are the three foundational karmas that guide a soul’s cycle of


life, death and rebirth. Prarabdha means “actions begun” or “set in motion.” These are the karmas we are living through right now because they were set in motion in the past. Kriyamana karma means “being made” and is all of the actions going on in our life right now only to return in the future. Sanchita means “accumulated actions” and is translated as the sum of all our karmas from this and past lives. Karma’s complex ôô]


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tion makes this Hindu law one of the cornerstones of our religion and


14 hinduism today april/may/june, 2017


can help clarify our current situation. In Vedantic literature, there is a beautiful anal- ogy. The bowman has already sent an arrow; it has left his hands and he cannot recall it. He is about to shoot another arrow. The bundle


of arrows in the quiver on his back is the Sanchita. The arrow he has shot is prarab- dha. And the arrow which he is about to shoot from his bow is kriyamana. Of these, he has perfect control over the sanchita and the kriyamana, but he must surely work out his prarabdha. For that is the past and has begun to take effect which he must experience.”


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blame for the misery of this life, which is the result of the evil I have committed in another, and say I will unmake it. This, then, is our philosophy of the migration of the soul: We come into this life with the experience of another, and the fortune or misfortune of this existence is the result of our acts in a former existence, and thus we are always becoming better, till at last perfection is reached. Swami Vivekananda, (1863-1902)


When he sat me down beside him, in Jaffna, he just started right in on me, saying, “What do you think you’re doing jumping around the world like that, wasting your energy? What a waste! Why don’t you sit,


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Morari Bapu, Gujarati kathakaar, HINDUISM TODAY’S Hindu of the Year


quietly, and say, “Who Am I? Who Am I? WHO AM I?!” Dr. James George, a Canadian disciple of Siva Yogaswami of Jaffna and international diplomat having just returned from a world tour, recounting one of his visits with the Lion of Jaffna.


Any religion can be compared to the attic of an old home. Unless the attic is regularly cleaned, it gathers dust and cobwebs and eventually becomes unusable. Similarly, if a religion cannot be updated or cleaned from time to time, it loses its usefulness and cannot relate anymore to changed times and people. Swami Bhaskarananda Saraswati (1833-1899), 19th-century sannyasin


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