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energy wise


How Old Are Your Appliances?


Association of Home Builders estimates that the average lifespan of your major household appliances is 10 years.


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That’s not as long as they used to last. For example, new clothes dryers and refrigerators 20 years ago were expected to last 13 years. But trash compactors back then were supposed to last for only six years, and microwaves and dishwashers, for nine years.


That’s not to say the warranty on those appliances lasts as long. Most appliances come with warranties of just one year. And the more you use an appliance, of course, the quicker it can wear out.


The efficiency of appliances can be measured by their “energy factors,” which are standard industry and government metrics that measure an appliance’s overall energy efficiency. One example of how technology has changed our home appliances: Today’s dishwashers consume less than half the energy of a 1981 model because of advances in soil sensors that minimize water usage, and the increased use of stainless interiors that accelerate drying time.


Room AC


f your home is full of appliances that qualify as “relics,” you’re beating the odds. The National


Plus, most homeowners replace their appliances before a decade has passed. At some point, in fact, you might find that it’s cheaper to replace an appliance than to continually repair it.


If you’re feeling lucky because your refrigerator, washing machine or water heater has lasted longer than you expected, you might not be as lucky as you think. The older an appliance gets, the less energy efficient it is as its seals wear out and its motor winds down.


Newer versions of those appliances have been designed to comply with updated regulations for energy and water efficiency, so they use less energy—which could lower your monthly power bill. A brand-new refrigerator, for example, could save you up to $100 a year, compared with a 20-year-old device, even though it’s still running fine.


Increases in the Energy Efficiency


of Household Appliances 1981-2013


ElectPay Puts You In Charge


Kiamichi Electric's ElectPay lets you decide how much you want to pay for electricity— and when you want to pay it. ElectPay is a great option for members on a budget, or for anyone who appreciates the option to choose


HOW IT WORKS:


When you sign up for ElectPay, your usage is calculated daily so you don’t receive a paper bill. Because you pay for your usage in advance, you will never have to worry about late payments, late fees, disconnect notices or bad credit.


ElectPay members monitor their daily usage and credit balance by logging on to Kiamichi Electric's payment portal, or calling Kiamichi Electric’s toll free automated service at 800-888-2731.


When your credit balance runs low, Kiamichi Electric will alert you via email or text, whichever you prefer. You decide the low balance point based on what you're comfortable with.


Payments are accepted at any Kiamichi Electric payment location or payment kiosk, or pay by mail, telephone or online at www.kiamichielectric.org.


Because ElectPay members pay more attention to their usage, they tend to use 10 to 15 percent less electricity than traditional consumers.


For more details on ElectPay, please call 800-888-2731.


Freezer Clothes Dryer Dishwasher Refrigerator


Light Post | may - june 2015 | 5


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