This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Summer Energy Savers


Take control of your summer energy bills with these easy steps:


* Sun block. Half of all of the heat that enters your home comes in through the windows. Invest in a thick shade or window film to block out the summer sun. Save up to 15 percent on your cooling bill by shading west-facing windows, which absorb the most afternoon sun. For the hottest parts of your house, consider installing an awning or planting trees in front of the window to shade the house.


* Quick change. A filter for your air conditioning system costs only dollars (about $5 for a high-quality, pleated mod- el), but can save you much more if you change it every month during the summer. Dirty air condi- tioning filters prevent air flow and make the air conditioning system work harder and run longer. That means a higher bill.


* One degree. For every degree you turn your thermostat up during air conditioning season, you’ll save up to 2 percent on your cooling costs. Try setting your thermostat at 78 degrees, and turn on a ceiling fan to help circulate the air.


* Wind chill. Fans don’t cool the air, but they make the air feel cooler by moving it around the room and against your skin, sort of a “wind chill” effect. When the fan is running, you can move your thermostat three to four degrees higher without noticing a dif- ference in your comfort level. If no one is in the room to feel the moving air, turn the fan off to save money.


* Cool touch. Replace every incandescent light bulb in your house with a compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb or an LED fixture. The replacements cost more at first than incandescents, but CFLs use 75 percent less energy and LEDs use less than one-tenth. These energy-efficient versions pay for themselves and then some over their lifetimes. Plus, they emit far less heat than incandescent bulbs , so they don’t add heat to your home’s air or make the air conditioner work harder.


It’s hot outside. Use cold water


Summertime is the perfect season to save money on water heating. It’s hot and sticky outside,


so there’s no need for long, steamy showers or heavy, hot meals that use a lot of energy and water to prepare.


Here are six quick tips for saving energy and money on water heating—during the summer and all year long:


1. Fix leaks. Even a slow-dripping water faucet can waste hundreds of gallons of hot water if you don’t repair it quickly.


2. Use cold water. Your clothes can get just as clean in cold water as in hot. Buy a laundry de- tergent for your clothes washer that’s designed to work well in cold temperatures.


3. If you’re ready to buy a new dishwasher, choose an energy-efficient model. It’s guaranteed to use less hot water than one that’s a decade old.


4. Install low-flow shower heads, toilets and fau- cets when you’re ready to replace your old ones.


5. Change your behavior—and your family’s. Turn the water off while you’re hand-washing the dish- es. Turn it on only to rinse; don’t let it run while you scrub.


6. Limit your time in the shower. You’ll feel more refreshed on a hot morning when you step out of a quick, warm shower than if you luxu- riate in the steam for too long.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134